Black Holes -- What methods to use to find them?

In summary: Sorry, I didn't realize you had been away for a while. I though you were just forgetting the standards for a moment. o:)
  • #1
jha192001
22
2
How many are the ways a Black hole without *ACCERTION DISK* can be spotted?
 
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  • #2
How many ways have you thought of?
 
  • #3
A couple other ways I can think of:

1. Orbits of stars nearby.
2. Gravitational micro-lensing.
3. Gravitational waves (if two black holes are orbiting each other).
4. Sending in TARS or CASE.
 
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  • #4
Matterwave said:
A couple other ways I can think of:

1. Orbits of stars nearby.
2. Gravitational micro-lensing.
3. Gravitational waves (if two black holes are orbiting each other).
4. Sending in TARS or CASE.
So, we are no longer expecting the OP to do some work before we give answers? Did you think ibix was not aware of these?
 
  • #5
phinds said:
So, we are no longer expecting the OP to do some work before we give answers? Did you think ibix was not aware of these?

Well, I thought sending in TARS or CASE was pretty clever... On a more serious note, I thought OP's question was simple enough that it didn't require the back and forth of asking OP to search elsewhere first. I generally leave the "please show effort" kind of responses to the Homework forum or for questions that are far too broad to answer concisely. If it's PF's current policy (I've been gone for a few years) that OP needs to show effort here as well, I can redact my post.
 
  • #6
No need to redact now that the OP has seen it. But yes, a common theme lately has been to try to get (especially new) users used to showing their efforts when they ask questions.

Great to have you back, @Matterwave -- you have been missed! :smile:
 
  • #7
Matterwave said:
4. Sending in TARS or CASE.
And I had to Google this one -- I learned something new! :smile:

upload_2018-9-28_10-23-30.png
 

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  • #8
berkeman said:
No need to redact now that the OP has seen it. But yes, a common theme lately has been to try to get (especially new) users used to showing their efforts when they ask questions.

Great to have you back, @Matterwave -- you have been missed! :smile:

Ok, I will keep this in mind in the future. And, thanks! :D
 
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  • #9
Matterwave said:
Ok, I will keep this in mind in the future. And, thanks! :D
Sorry, I didn't realize you had been away for a while. I though you were just forgetting the standards for a moment. o:)
 
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1. What is a black hole?

A black hole is a region of space where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing, including light, can escape from it. This is due to the extreme density and mass of the object, which causes a significant distortion of space and time.

2. How do scientists find black holes?

There are several methods used to find black holes, including observing the effects of their gravity on surrounding objects and detecting radiation emitted from matter as it falls into the black hole. Scientists also use advanced telescopes and other instruments to study the behavior of stars and gas clouds near the center of galaxies, which can indicate the presence of a black hole.

3. Can black holes be seen?

No, black holes cannot be seen directly as they do not emit any light. However, the effects of a black hole on surrounding matter can be observed, such as the distortion of light from stars or the emission of radiation from matter falling into the black hole.

4. How do scientists measure the size of a black hole?

The size of a black hole is typically measured by its event horizon, which is the point of no return where the gravitational pull becomes too strong for anything to escape. The event horizon's size is directly related to the mass of the black hole, so scientists can estimate the size by measuring the mass and using mathematical equations.

5. Are there any new methods being developed to find black holes?

Yes, scientists are constantly developing new methods to find black holes. One recent method is using gravitational wave detectors, which can detect ripples in space-time caused by the merging of two black holes. Other methods being explored include using pulsars and studying the cosmic microwave background radiation for anomalies that could indicate the presence of a black hole.

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