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Broccoli, NMN and anti-aging

  1. Oct 28, 2016 #1

    jim mcnamara

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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161027122047.htm
    nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) -> NAD is once again in the news. Anti-aging effects.

    Note that there are previous mouse studies that show NMN rapidly converts into available NAD in vivo.
    Nicotinamide dinuclueotide (NAD) levels and production go down in mouse tissues as the mouse ages. Humans as well. The concept is to supplement NMN thus increasing NAD levels, which in mice has been demonstrated to have an effect.

    NMN is found in broccoli and some of its cruciferous companions like cabbage and brussel sprouts. Which are safe to eat. Even though you may find them revolting.

    Unfortunately, I would suspect NMN will become the next anti-aging "hot" supplement. A word to the wise: there are transport molecules (e.g., passenger specific lipoproteins ) that act like little shuttles to move nutrients around in the bloodstream and into cells. The transport system can be swamped by supplements. The same lipoprotein "taxi" that moves vitamin C also moves Zn and Cu. So if you take 1000mg of vitamin C, the transport system breaks down for Zn and Cu because the system is overloaded with vitamin C passengers. Over time with continued supplementation you become deficient in Cu and/or Zn.

    I believe this model works for larger molecules, like NMN, as well.

    Eat broccoli instead. BTW it has vitamin C.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 29, 2016 #2
    Thanks! this was a really cool post :D
     
  4. Oct 30, 2016 #3

    Q_Goest

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    Hi Jim. Do you know if NMN in vegetables gets broken down at all with cooking?

    Is cooking those vegetables beneficial in any way, perhaps by making the compound easier to absorb?
     
  5. Oct 30, 2016 #4

    jim mcnamara

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    https://books.google.com/books?id=IjqaBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA93&lpg=PA93&dq=is+NMN+heat+stable&source=bl&ots=eY6VXsNAEe&sig=5G-ywjWf5_W_Wv3ZC77R0DsAd18&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjsmcCA2YPQAhXG5SYKHW59DG4Q6AEIODAE#v=onepage&q=is NMN heat stable&f=false

    IF you can read it, says that NMN is heat stable at 95° C for 6 minutes. . So the method of cooking veggies and what nutrient you want to keep is everything. Bioavailability is increased for some foods and some nutrients. Broccoli does show increased availability of polyphenols with low moisture cooking for example.

    See: https://authoritynutrition.com/cooking-nutrient-content for a very generalized overview for lay people. Leaching nutrients out of food is more important for water soluble nutrients. NMN is water soluble - 10mg/ml
    This topic, raw vs cooked, is 'controversial' in our Western society - which means nutrition science is becoming a take or leave it thing, a DIY reality, not-Science. . Food preps are among the worst areas IMO. Ever see a VitaMix ad?
     
  6. Oct 30, 2016 #5

    Evo

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    I love broccoli and cauliflower slightly roasted, I wonder if that is ok? I know vegetables like collard greens must be cooked in order for humans to be able to access the vitamins and minerals, and then you also consume the water they cook in which is referred to as pot liquor.

    Here is an example from Nutrition data's website.

    Collard 1 cup chopped raw

    RDA
    Vitamin A 48%
    Vitamin C 21%
    Calcium 5%
    Iron 0%

    Collard 1 cup cooked, drained

    Vitamin A 308%
    Vitamin C 58%
    Calcium 27%
    Iron 12%

    Cooking breaks down the tough cellular walls and allows the vitamins to be absorbed. Eaten raw, the human body is unable to absorb the nutrients.

    For someone that wants another source http://www.vegparadise.com/highestperch55.html#Nutrition
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2016
  7. Oct 30, 2016 #6

    jim mcnamara

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    In a way, you can think of cooking as something like predigestion. Rendering the food for easier complete digestion. Cooking gave early humans advantages: fewer parasites in food, fewer food-borne pathogens, and more nutritional bang for the buck spent finding and gathering food.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2016
  8. Oct 31, 2016 #7

    jim mcnamara

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    Actually there is extra factor to consider. Anti-nutrients are common in some raw foods. Examples: phytates, saponins, lectins. Anti-nutrients render nutrient molecules undigestable.
    A look at phytates -
    Phytates are common in beans - pinto beans, black beans,and so on. Phytate actually 'gloms' onto some kinds nutrients in the human gut. Raw green peas - like snap peas in a salad, can denature proteins making them very close to undigestable and render Zn, Cu and some other micronutrients unavailable. Cooked green peas do not exhibit much of this. Dosa is an Indian flat bread-like food item. Tastes great. They are made from fermented lentils in South India. Phytates are reduced during fermentation.

    http://indianhealthyrecipes.com/dosa-recipe-dosa-batter/ If you ever made lentil soup, the cooking time is ~1hour, fermented lentils about 20 minutes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytic_acid (phytates are the salt.)
     
  9. Nov 1, 2016 #8

    Drakkith

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    Indeed. I suspect the only true anti-aging agent is a rocket engine. But the folks over in the relativity forum would probably point out that you always age at the same rate in your own frame of reference (rats! foiled again!).
     
  10. Nov 14, 2017 #9
    I know I'm way late to the party here but..... can someone tell me how much NMN is in one serving of broccoli? I can't seem to find any references...
     
  11. Nov 14, 2017 #10

    Evo

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    So far there haven't been any studies that have shown positive effects on humans. From 2017.

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03151239
     
  12. Nov 14, 2017 #11

    jim mcnamara

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    @kyle swanson You make the stuff in your cells from the niacin in foods.

    Find any food and what it contains in the USDA nutrient database. In fact the default food example is "broccoli, raw". Select standard reference in the first box.
    https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2871 <- this shows raw broccoli.

    Click the 'Full Report (all nutrients) box to see all data for it. It has .581mg of niacin in a cup of chopped raw broccoli.

    Niagen and other NMN supplements are expensive. As all get out. Mice do better on supplementation. There is no proof that people get benefits from taking supplements of the stuff. Click the link Evo gave on the trial for NMN supplementation for diabetics.. The trial will complete on or before 2020.

    There are LOTS of studies to show that eating properly prepared broccoli and its cousins have positive effects on humans. i.e., do not overcook it, do NOT boil it, steam it or microwave it.
     
  13. Nov 15, 2017 #12
    I actually like broccoli, cooked and smothered in butter:) I wonder if cooking screws up the NMN bit. I don't mind raw either if I can soak it in sauce.
     
  14. Nov 15, 2017 #13
    Thanks! I was just trying to calculate how much broccoli humans would need to eat to equate the similar rodents dosages in a study I was reading. It was 300-500mg/kg/day. Looks we'd probably have to eat A LOT of broccoli. LOL!!
     
  15. Nov 15, 2017 #14
    I had a huge crop of broccoli in my garden this year. I'll plant more next year!
     
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