Can a single star with 6 to 8 solar masses end up as a supernova 1a?

  • #1
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Summary:

Can a single star with 6 to 8 solar masses end up as a supernova 1 (having a remnant mass slightly above the Chandrasekhar limit) and being completely disrupted?

Main Question or Discussion Point

Can a single star with 6 to 8 solar masses end up as a supernova 1 (having a remnant mass slightly above the Chandrasekhar limit) and being completely disrupted?

This idea is presented by John Gribbin in his books “Stardust” and “The Universe”, but I can’t find any other reference or source describing this case..
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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As far as I know, the origin of SNe Ia are in binary systems (so, bad news for a single star) of a white dwarf (which have masses smaller than 2 solar masses, so more bad news) and another star, and the WD is accreting matter from the other until it becomes a supernova. So in a first look, I would say that it is not possible, maybe someone who knows more can tell you further things.
 
  • #3
phyzguy
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There are two possible secenarios that give rise to SN1A. The first is what @Gaussian97 described, a WD accreting matter from a normal (i.e. non-degenerate) star until it exceeds the Chandrasekhar limit and explodes. This is called the "Singly Degenerate" (SD) scenario. The second is two WD stars which orbit each other and spiral in due to gravitational wave emission until they collide and merge, leading to a singel WD above the Chandrasekhar limit, which explodes. This is called the "Doubly Degenerate" (DD) scenario. There is some evidence for both, and it is not clear whether all SN1A are SD, all SN1A are DD, or SN1A are a mixture of both. As far as I know, there is no proposed scenario in which a single star gives rise to a SN1A.
 
  • #4
Fede said:
Can a single star with 6 to 8 solar masses end up as a supernova 1 (having a remnant mass slightly above the Chandrasekhar limit) and being completely disrupted?

This idea is presented by John Gribbin in his books “Stardust” and “The Universe”, but I can’t find any other reference or source describing this case..
Yes, it's called a "carbon detonation supernova" and depending on how much helium burning adds to the core during shell burning, it's thought that the carbon core remains supported by degeneracy pressure until reaching that critical amount of mass where the pressure can no longer support it and, exactly like an accreting white dwarf, an explosion occurs leaving no remnant behind. The cores of stars of greater mass begin to burn carbon non-degenerately and so evolve beyond this stage, ending their lives as type II supernovae. The reason you haven't heard of them is that the two types were classified based on the spectra they leave behind. Type I have no hydrogen lines, while carbon detonation supernovae still have a hydrogen envelope as they're also the result of core-collapse.
 

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