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Can antiparticles annihilate different types of particles?

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  1. May 20, 2015 #1
    The title says it all. For example can an anti-neutron annihilate with an electron?

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 20, 2015 #2
    they can react but it's not called annihilation.
    I suppose you can have antineutron + electron -> antiproton + electron neutrino.
     
  4. May 23, 2015 #3
    It can be boiled down to the collision of quarks and anti quarks.
     
  5. May 23, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    Not if you collide an antineutron with an electron.

    For baryon/antibaryon collisions: sure.
     
  6. May 23, 2015 #5
    I think it's important to note that elementary particle-antiparticle collisions can only result in an annihilation if they are of the same type. This is pretty much by definition, otherwise some conservation law (conservation of electric charge, for example) would be violated, which would not allow the process.
    Scattering of composite particles, such as hadrons, would boil down to the logic described above.
     
  7. May 24, 2015 #6

    mfb

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    You have reactions like ##K_s \to \gamma \gamma##. A rare decay, but still possible (and measured). The same should be possible for D0, B0 and Bs, but there are just upper limits. All those decays are similar to quark/antiquark annihilation with different quark types.
    See also This paper for theory predictions.
     
  8. May 24, 2015 #7
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