Can Vinegar and Sulfuric Acid Solutions Share the Same pH?

  • Thread starter jammon
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Ph
In summary, a person has asked for help with three questions related to chemistry. The first question is about calculating the pH of a 5% sulfuric acid solution without pH papers and comparing it to a 5% acetic acid solution. The second question is about the miscibility of a non-polar solvent and ethanol and the possibility of water traces remaining at the bottom. The third question is about using hydrogen peroxide as a replacement for permanganate in an oxidizing reaction and the differences between the two agents. The person also mentions a discussion on a forum where they did not receive an answer to their questions.
  • #1
jammon
4
0
Hi there, I was wondering if anyone could help me with 3 questions:

1) Without pH papers, how do you calculate the pH of a 5% H2SO4 (sulfuric acid) solution?
I know vinegar is a weak acid, but would a 5% acetic acid have the same pH of a %5 H2So4 solution?

2) If a non-polar solvent such as Hexane is miscible with Ethanol, does that mean that they mix completely? If so, would the water traces from the alcohol stay at the bottom below the Hexane layer?

3) H202 (Hydrogen peroxide) is an oxidizing agent just like Permanganate. I need to replace the later, is it possible to dilute or concentrate Peroxide in order to make it work like Permanganate?
Besides one begin stronger than the other, what other differences are there between these oxidizing agents? :confused:

Thanks :biggrin:
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
gee 300 views and no one has a clue on this school chemistry? :confused:
and it's not homework, just something I've always wondered
 
  • #4
Thank you
 
  • #5


Hello there, I am happy to assist you with your questions about solutions and pH.

1) Without pH papers, there are a few methods you can use to calculate the pH of a 5% H2SO4 solution. One way is to use a pH meter, which measures the hydrogen ion concentration in a solution and gives a direct reading of the pH. Another method is to use indicators, such as litmus paper or universal indicator solution, which change color based on the pH of the solution. You can also use a titration method, where you add a known amount of a base solution (such as sodium hydroxide) to the sulfuric acid until the solution reaches a neutral pH, and then use that amount to calculate the original concentration of the acid. As for your question about vinegar and sulfuric acid having the same pH, the pH of a solution depends on its concentration and strength of the acid, so a 5% acetic acid solution may not have the same pH as a 5% sulfuric acid solution.

2) If a solvent is miscible with another solvent, it means that they can mix together in any proportion. So, yes, if hexane and ethanol are miscible, they will mix completely. Water traces from the alcohol will likely stay at the bottom below the hexane layer, as water is more dense than hexane.

3) While both hydrogen peroxide and permanganate are oxidizing agents, they have different properties and uses. Diluting or concentrating hydrogen peroxide will not make it work exactly like permanganate, as the reaction mechanisms and products may be different. Some differences between these oxidizing agents include their stability, reactivity, and selectivity for different types of reactions.

I hope this helps answer your questions. If you need further clarification or assistance, please let me know. Good luck with your studies!
 

Related to Can Vinegar and Sulfuric Acid Solutions Share the Same pH?

1. What is a solution?

A solution is a mixture of two or more substances that are evenly distributed at the molecular level. It consists of a solvent (the substance in which other substances dissolve) and solutes (the substances that are dissolved).

2. How is pH defined?

pH is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm of the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+) in a solution. A pH of 7 is considered neutral, while values below 7 are acidic and values above 7 are basic.

3. How do you calculate pH?

The pH of a solution can be calculated using the formula: pH = -log[H+], where [H+] represents the concentration of hydrogen ions in moles per liter. Alternatively, pH can be determined using a pH meter or pH test strips.

4. What factors can affect the pH of a solution?

The pH of a solution can be affected by the concentration of hydrogen ions, the strength of the acid or base, temperature, and the presence of other substances that can either donate or accept hydrogen ions.

5. Why is maintaining a proper pH important?

Maintaining a proper pH is important for biological systems, as many biochemical reactions are pH-dependent. In addition, a balanced pH is necessary for the proper functioning of enzymes and other proteins. In industrial and environmental settings, pH control is crucial for various processes and to prevent harm to living organisms.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
21K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
14K
Replies
16
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
5K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
14
Views
13K
Back
Top