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B Casimir effect, energy conservation

  1. Nov 28, 2017 #1
    I was reading some articles about Casimir effect. It turns out that some virtual particles are created and suddenly disappears amd that these particles can exert a pressure on the plates. It seems that this creation breaks energy conservation law, but it cannot be.I would like to know which system provides the energy to actually create these particles.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 28, 2017 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Why doesn't having two plates connected by a spring violate energy conservation?
     
  4. Nov 28, 2017 #3

    bhobba

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    Virtual particles do not actually exist - its one of a number of myths of QM:
    https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0609163

    This is a beginner level thread, but explaining what the Casimir Force really is, is an advanced topic. I will tell you the answer then refer you to advanced papers so you understand I am not just making this up. Its really just a relativistic Van der Waals force. You probably learned about Van der Waals forces in your chemistry class at HS - that's all that's really going on. Now for the papers justifying it:
    http://www.theo.phys.ulg.ac.be/~cugnon/cas.pdf

    And from the person that wrote the myths and facts paper I gave a link to:
    https://arxiv.org/abs/1605.04143

    Thanks
    Bill
     
  5. Nov 29, 2017 #4

    Demystifier

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    The Casimir force is just a collective effect of electromagnetic forces between charges that constitute atoms of which the Casimir plates are made. The electromagnetic force, of course, does not violate energy conservation.

    For more details see also https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...vacuum-energy-and-a-bit-of-relativity.882958/
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
  6. Dec 16, 2017 at 4:27 PM #5
    It does violate energy conservation. But only a bit.
     
  7. Dec 16, 2017 at 4:29 PM #6
    "The electromagnetic force, of course, does not violate energy conservation."

    So if I take a lot of energy from the vacuum to boil a nice cup of tea, you won't be upset.

    Excellent.
     
  8. Dec 16, 2017 at 6:04 PM #7

    Vanadium 50

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    That's just not true.
     
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