Circular motion and tension problem

In summary: T - one in terms of cos(theta) and one in terms of sin^2(theta)You equated them.Solve it and you can find theta.
  • #1
VenomHowell15
14
0
http://capaserv.physics.mun.ca/msuphysicslib/Graphics/Gtype11/prob03_pendulum.gif
A mass of 8.700 kg is suspended from a 1.490 m long string. It revolves in a horizontal circle.
The tangential speed of the mass is 3.755 m/s. Calculate the angle between the string and the vertical (in degrees).


There's the question I'm given. I cannot get terribly far with this one, despite being able to ace all the other questions on the assignment... Nonetheless, that is moot.

There are 3 unknowns here for this problem... Fortunately, one of the unknowns can be written in terms of the other one. The radius of the lower circle can be written as (r)(sin(theta)) which is in turn (1.490)(sin(theta)). I believe tension can be written as T=mg/(cos(theta)), but I'm not entirely sure.

I've attempted to do (mv^2)/(r(sin(theta)) = (mg)/(cos(theta)) and work it through to get ((v^2)/(gr)) = (tan(theta)), but it's not giving me the correct answer.

I'm kind of stuck, not sure where I'm going wrong with this.
 
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  • #2
Split the tension of the rope into horizontal and vertical components and then apply the second law in both directions.
 
  • #3
Did you get there yet? What is the answer? I tried it by eliminating all but theta and if I'm right, I'll give you some clues.
 
  • #4
Tx = (mv^2)/(sin(theta)r) and Ty=(mg)/(cos(theta))

I can do that, sure, Neutrino. Just not sure what else to do with it from there. I have neither tension, theta, or the radius of the conical base. Only the length of the string, the mass, and the velocity.
 
  • #5
So eliminate all but one variable ...

by resolving vertically you can get T in terms of theta and you already have R in terms of theta, so you now have just one variable.

You say your answer isn't correct. What is the correct answer?
 
  • #6
I keep getting 44.0 degrees, but I think I know what I'm doing wrong, so I'll get back to you on that after playing around with the formula some more.
 
  • #7
If you know what the correct answer is I might be able to give you some clues.

I have an answer, but would like to know it's correct before leading you up the garden path.
 
  • #8
rsk said:
If you know what the correct answer is I might be able to give you some clues.

I have an answer, but would like to know it's correct before leading you up the garden path.

Me too, me too! :biggrin: :-p
 
  • #9
GO on radou, what did you get? 51.1?
 
  • #10
rsk said:
GO on radou, what did you get? 51.1?

Umm...nope. :smile: I'd rather not get involved. :biggrin:
 
  • #11
oh well, bedtime.
 
  • #12
rsk said:
oh well, bedtime.

Last off-topic post: well, it sure is long past bedtime where I'm from. :smile:
 
  • #13
rsk said:
GO on radou, what did you get? 51.1?

According to the computer, that's the answer I should be getting... So, yes, 51.1 is the correct answer. I'm just not quite able to get that.

I'm betting I'm just running into one little snag in the process that's messing it up.
 
  • #14
VenomHowell15 said:
Tx = (mv^2)/(sin(theta)r) and Ty=(mg)/(cos(theta))

I can do that, sure, Neutrino. Just not sure what else to do with it from there. I have neither tension, theta, or the radius of the conical base. Only the length of the string, the mass, and the velocity.
The problem is that one of these equations is not correct. Draw the FBD with the tension and gravity acting. Resolve the tension into components, and be careful about what you are equating. The mass is moving horizontally in a circular path, so the horizontal component of the net force is the centripetal force. The net vertical force is zero.
 
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  • #15
OK venom. If it's not too late here's what I did. If is IS too alte - sorry - but I did offer this hours and hours ago!

First I resolved vertically. That gives you an expression for T in terms of theta - in terms of cos(theta) to be precise - which I think you already wrote somewhere earlier.

Then I resolved horizontally. You put R = Lsin theta (L = total length) and this gives you an expression for T in terms of theta - but it's got a sin^2(theta) in it.

You now have two expressions for T - one in terms of cos(theta) and one in terms of sin^2(theta)

Equate them, and remember that sin^2(theta) = 1 - cos^2(theta)

Now you have a quadratic equation where cos(theta) is the variable

Solve it and you can find theta.
 
  • #16
OK venom. If it's not too late here's what I did. If is IS too alte - sorry - but I did offer this hours and hours ago!

First I resolved vertically. That gives you an expression for T in terms of theta - in terms of cos(theta) to be precise - which I think you already wrote somewhere earlier.

Then I resolved horizontally. You put R = Lsin theta (L = total length) and this gives you an expression for T in terms of theta - but it's got a sin^2(theta) in it.

You now have two expressions for T - one in terms of cos(theta) and one in terms of sin^2(theta)

Equate them, and remember that sin^2(theta) = 1 - cos^2(theta)

Now you have a quadratic equation where cos(theta) is the variable

Solve it and you can find theta.
 
  • #17
Ah-ha! Perfect! Thanks guys. That really helped me out!
 

Related to Circular motion and tension problem

1. What is circular motion?

Circular motion is the movement of an object along a circular path. It occurs when an object moves at a constant speed around a fixed point, called the center of rotation.

2. What is tension in circular motion?

In circular motion, tension is a force that is exerted by an object on another object that is connected by a string or rope. It is always directed towards the center of the circular path and is responsible for keeping the object moving in a circular motion.

3. How is tension related to centripetal force?

Tension in circular motion is related to centripetal force, which is the force that keeps an object moving in a circular path. In order for an object to maintain circular motion, the tension force must be equal and opposite to the centripetal force.

4. What factors affect the amount of tension in circular motion?

The amount of tension in circular motion is affected by the mass of the object, the speed of the object, and the radius of the circular path. As these factors change, the tension force will also change in order to maintain circular motion.

5. How can we calculate tension in circular motion?

The tension force in circular motion can be calculated using the formula T = (mv^2)/r, where T is the tension force, m is the mass of the object, v is the speed, and r is the radius of the circular path. This formula is derived from Newton's second law, F=ma, where F is the net force in the direction of motion, m is the mass, and a is the acceleration towards the center of the circular path.

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