Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids

In summary, the American Physical Society has created a coloring book for kids called "Color Me Physics" to introduce young minds to the world of physics in a fun and interactive way. The book features illustrations and activities that teach children about different concepts in physics, such as energy, motion, and the properties of matter. It also includes real-life examples and experiments to encourage critical thinking and curiosity about the world around us. This coloring book is a great resource for parents and educators to spark an interest in science and inspire the next generation of physicists.
  • #1
ZapperZ
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
32,820
4,717
OK, this would have been funny if it were a joke. However, the American Physical Society (APS) has produced a http://www.physicscentral.com/coloringbook/index.html" . It intends to "... introduce children to physics and some of its most famous characters..." I kid you not! :bugeye:

How successful the book is remains unknown. If you have children of the age intended, and you decide to download and try it out, I'd love to hear from you of the outcome. It'll be our own (non)scientific test on whether such a thing actually works!

:biggrin:

Zz.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
That actually sounds like a good idea (though I haven't looked at the link yet...am I likely to change my mind if I do?)

They have things like anatomy coloring books to get kids interested in science (and laugh if you want, but I've known undergrads who used it to supplement their biology lessons...they seemed to remember things better when coloring them in, and the labels were all accurate).

Edit: I just looked at some of the pages. :smile: I guess it's NOT going to introduce them to proper English grammar! :bugeye: Couldn't they have made the physicists a bit smaller and the rest of the picture, that looks more fun to color in, a bit bigger? Who wants to color in Copernicus (what color crayon do you use for a physicist anyway?) when they could color in the planets? :smile:
 
Last edited:
  • #3
I agree. This is great.
 
  • #4
Aww its cute! I'm going to d/l it for my grandson, not that it would be a true test, he colors everything that isn't moveing.
 
  • #5
Moonbear said:
They have things like anatomy coloring books to get kids interested in science (and laugh if you want, but I've known undergrads who used it to supplement their biology lessons...they seemed to remember things better when coloring them in, and the labels were all accurate).

That's what my brother did!
 
  • #6
ZapperZ said:
OK, this would have been funny if it were a joke. However, the American Physical Society (APS) has produced a http://www.physicscentral.com/coloringbook/index.html" . It intends to "... introduce children to physics and some of its most famous characters..." I kid you not! :bugeye:
Zz.
Ah! - Now I understand...:smile:

Garth
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7
I want to see a pro-string/anti-string coloring book that has colorful language.
 
Last edited:
  • #8
Ivan Seeking said:
I want to see a pro-string/anti-string coloring book that has colorful language.
Do I see a new physics party coming on? The physicists will be split into either Stringist or Anti-Stringists! God this gives me a great idea for a comic, too bad I can't draw...
 
  • #9
Ivan Seeking said:
I want to see a pro-string/anti-string coloring book that has colorful language.

Actually, there is a string coloring book, only no one has made an observation of it yet.

<slaps himself silly> :smile:

Zz.
 
  • #10
Does it come with three color, and three anti-color crayons?
 
  • #11
haha, the last page in the book says, 'now draw yourself as a physicist' and leave a nice blank page for you :smile:
 
  • #12
moose said:
Do I see a new physics party coming on? The physicists will be split into either Stringist or Anti-Stringists! God this gives me a great idea for a comic, too bad I can't draw...
Seriously, the ability to draw has nothing to do with making http://xkcd.com/c181.html".
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #13
Ah, the joys of electronic art. I can just import that to Illustrator and colour it without ever picking up my crayons. :approve:
(Good thing, too, because the budgie ate all of my green ones and W put the rest someplace where I can't find them. )

Good comics, Dave. I love that second one. :smile:
 
  • #15
ZapperZ said:
Actually, there is a string coloring book, only no one has made an observation of it yet.

<slaps himself silly> :smile:

Zz.


For some reason I laughed really hard at that.:smile:
 
  • #16
What was the creative team thinking?
hideous. Yes -- people too large... cheesy rhymes not REAL science.
And much too PC with the diversity of kids on the cover. "Color me physics" indeed! :smile: In order to get all major skin colors in we must put the Asian girl in the wheelchair? Please. Why isn't the blond white kid with glasses depicted as blind with assist-dog and cane?

When one of my stepsons (at age seven) drew a picture of me "in the lab" I was very small and surrounded by bottles, hoses, beakers, and all kinds of stuff... me in a dangerous lab, free of interference from campus "Environmental Health and Safety" regulations! YEA! The cell and anatomy coloring books are full of useful information. Kids above five would know and respect that. Kids I know would. Heck -- the "diverse" kids you want to reach have seen a LOT and know a LOT.

Kid's aren't dumb, don't treat 'em like they are, or you won't catch their attention. It's patriarchal in the worse way. :mad: :mad: :mad:

And:
WHY WHY WHY give Maria Gepphart a female symbol to lean on? I'm not a nuclear physicist, but I don't think that's a symbol for nuclear force. Am I wrong there? Please inform me if I am -- this book doesn't.

BLAH. They probably dumped lots of money into it and should have come up with better. Pay some of us to fix it up.
 

Related to Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids

1. What is "Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids"?

"Color Me Physics" is a coloring book created by the American Physical Society to introduce young children to the world of physics through interactive and engaging activities.

2. Who is the target audience for "Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids"?

The coloring book is designed for children ages 5-8, but can also be enjoyed by children of all ages who are interested in learning about physics.

3. What topics are covered in "Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids"?

The coloring book covers a wide range of physics topics, including energy, forces, motion, light, sound, and electricity. Each topic is presented in a fun and interactive way to make learning about physics enjoyable for children.

4. How can "Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids" benefit children?

The coloring book can help children develop an interest in science and physics at an early age. It also promotes creativity and critical thinking skills through the hands-on activities and coloring pages.

5. Is "Color Me Physics: American Physical Society Coloring Book for Kids" scientifically accurate?

Yes, the coloring book was created by a team of physicists and educators to ensure that all information presented is scientifically accurate and up-to-date. The activities and illustrations are also designed to accurately represent the concepts being taught.

Similar threads

Replies
6
Views
4K
Replies
13
Views
10K
  • Art, Music, History, and Linguistics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • New Member Introductions
Replies
2
Views
775
Replies
17
Views
3K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
29
Views
7K
  • General Discussion
Replies
33
Views
5K
  • MATLAB, Maple, Mathematica, LaTeX
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • MATLAB, Maple, Mathematica, LaTeX
Replies
20
Views
4K
Back
Top