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Cornflakes for better breakfasts

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  1. Mar 13, 2018 #1
    I watched a documentary about cornflakes. The documentary was long and professionally prepared. As far as I remember its name was cornflakes wars. In the documentary it is claimed that the Americans gave up English-type breakfast consisting of pork loin and egg and started to eat cornflakes in breakfasts. This dietry change made the Americans more stronger and healthy. But in some newspaper cornflakes are not adviced because they are traded i.e is undergoned through some operations. In their packages, it is claimed that they contain a considerable amount of iron, vitamin b12, vitamin b6, ... Is prefering cornflakes for brekfast a good dietry? Do they really make people stronger and healthier? What do you think about this situation.

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  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 13, 2018 #2

    opus

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    Gold Member

    Its cardboard tasting cereal made from processed corn. Id take a real breakfast over that any day.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2018 #3

    jim mcnamara

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    Staff: Mentor

    Before this thread goes off-track, let's note some facts

    1. Cornflakes were originally created to make 'better food' for breakfast, i.e., improve nutrition.
    2. Their main benefit was shelf stability, not improved nutrition. Eating most grains (like oatmeal) with milk has pretty much the same result, nutritionally. Except for nutrients like table sugar (sucrose) and sodium.

    This is the USDA nutrition report on one brand of cornflakes. Per FDA (US regulations)The data here has to be displayed on the package, in a simplified form for one serving. Also required is a list of ingredients. For example, note sugar (9g) and salt (Sodium 729mg -- about 10 times the level in a corn kernel), which are not naturally occurring in the quantities used to the cereal. These two added ingredients are orders of magnitude higher than corn itself, especially sodium.

    Please before you make assertions about nutrition of anything else, go to the USDA site and look things up. We want to make fair comparisons, not offhand opinions. Okay?

    See these two links:
    Ingredient list: http://www.kellogg.co.nz/en_NZ/corn-flakes-product.html
    USDA nutrient database: https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/1788?manu=&fgcd=&ds=Standard Reference
     
  5. Mar 13, 2018 #4

    Evo

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    Don't forget that breakfast cereal is loaded with vitamin supplements.
     
  6. Mar 13, 2018 #5

    jim mcnamara

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    Sadly the vitamin content for most commercial breakfast magically improved right before the labeling requirements became mandatory. In the US.
     
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