Coupling Using Theta as a Boundary

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between mass and gravitational field, specifically in terms of a coupling equation. The speaker also mentions the role of zero-point energy and its contribution to the total energy of the gravitational field. They also speculate on the role of the electromagnetic interaction in this system.
  • #1
Goldstone1
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0
Suppose I have a mass [tex]M_0[/tex] (here denoted with lowercase zero because of previous discussions on relativistic mass), and I have a gravitational field [tex]\phi[/tex] which can under make a shift of [tex]180^o[/tex] between a negative plane and a positive plane. Assume also that the mass is considered as a charge, rather than something being separate to it, and then:

[tex]\Delta E \Psi= \sum_{i}^{\theta} M_{0i} \phi (\Lambda^{-1} x) \psi_i[/tex]

The question is the coupling. Since the boundary of the sum is the shift of [tex]-sin \theta[/tex] and [tex]-cos \theta[/tex] then [tex]\phi[/tex] is related to the mass by the probability coupling field [tex]\Psi[/tex]. Have I made my coupling correctly?
 
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  • #2
I haven't heard anything on my post. I wonder if that was because of a lack of information?

Interestingly, as I speak of the [tex]M^2\phi^2[/tex]-term as an oscillation of some field energy [1], I must be saying the square root of this energy is the range in which the field invariant takes on shift values of [tex]\pi \in (\mathcal{R},\mathcal{C})[/tex]. This is a gravitational charge energy - the mass of the quantum in question. Because one can invoke the inverse solution equation ''implying a change in the field'' [tex]\Delta \phi(x)[/tex], you find

[tex]\Delta E \Psi = \sum_{i}^{\theta} M_i \phi(\Lambda^{-1}x) \psi_i[/tex]

the interaction term [tex]M_{i}\psi_{i} \psi^{\dagger}_{i}[/tex] on [tex]\phi(\psi_i)[/tex] insures a self-interactive Hamiltonian [tex]\mathcal{H}[/tex]. What we have is a gravitational energy Hamiltonian that can be converted in the understanding of conventional mass weighing systems, There are many contributions to the system which does not involve the mass alone - for instance the energy of the electric and magnetic vacuum are not taken into consideration, but it will be a project of mine these next few weeks to understand that kind of system. For instance, as I have speculated, physics says that an electron absorption of a fluctuation of the zero-point energies has dimensions [tex]\frac{eh}{2Mc}[/tex].

[tex]\mathcal{H} \Psi = (\sum_{i}^{\theta} M_i \phi(\Lambda^{-1}x) + \frac{eh}{2Mc}) \psi_i[/tex]

This equation is the total energy of the gravitational field with a contribution of zero-point energy, a photon in this case. So this is a quantum description of the energy of a field, the gravitational field - and the field occupies gradients where the photon in the zero-point field lie on the range [tex]\phi=0[/tex] as a ground state boundary system. This is just quantum mechanics right? I don't see how you can falsify the condition of the Hamiltonian...

[1] - It plays a form, increased by one scalar field [tex]\phi[/tex], that the electromagnetic interaction [tex]D_{\mu}D^{\mu} \phi[/tex] which has the value of [tex]M^2 \phi[/tex] -
this is famously known as the mass-squared term [tex]M^2[/tex].
 

Related to Coupling Using Theta as a Boundary

What is "Coupling Using Theta as a Boundary"?

Coupling using theta as a boundary is a method of connecting two separate systems or components in a way that allows them to communicate and work together effectively. This is achieved by defining a boundary or interface between the two systems using the theta parameter.

Why is coupling important in scientific research?

Coupling is important in scientific research because it allows for the integration of different systems and components, allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of complex phenomena. It also enables researchers to simulate real-world interactions and test hypotheses in a controlled environment.

What is the role of theta in coupling?

Theta plays a critical role in coupling as it serves as the boundary or interface between two systems. It helps to define the interactions and communication between the two systems and allows for the exchange of information and energy.

What are the advantages of using theta as a boundary in coupling?

Using theta as a boundary in coupling offers several advantages, including a clear definition of the interface between systems, the ability to control and adjust the coupling strength, and the ability to model and simulate complex interactions in a simplified manner.

Are there any limitations to coupling using theta as a boundary?

While coupling using theta as a boundary is a useful method, it does have some limitations. For example, it may not accurately represent all real-world interactions, and the choice of the theta parameter may require some trial and error to find the most appropriate value.

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