Delimma: Need advice from industry's point of view

In summary, the conversation is about a person completing their degree in Applied Physics and considering taking courses in Semiconductor Physics, Solid State Physics, Modern Optics Physics, and Electromagnetic Waves. They are also considering a minor in Computer and Electronics Design and the possibility of a double major in Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering. The question is whether the minor or double major would give them a better chance at getting a job in the semiconductor industry. The person is also concerned about their age and whether it will affect their job prospects. The expert suggests that having an engineering degree would make it easier to get a job in the semiconductor industry, but there are also opportunities for applied physicists in technology development. However, the job market may be more competitive for those without
  • #1
Parsian
2
0
Hi,

I am currently completing my degree in Applied Physics (starting 4th year) with the hope to work in Semi Conductors industry and computer world (research or engineering or both). My school is offering the following courses for my degree:

http://students.sfu.ca/calendar/physics/appld_phys_hon.html

I am not planning to apply for Honours, but do plan to take the course loads for the knowledge. The program gives me the option to also take followings in addition to Semi Conductor Physics, Solid State Physics, Modern Optics Physics, Electromagnetic Waves:

ENSC 426: High Freq. Electronics; ENSC 495: Introduction to Microelectronic Fabrication; ENSC 330: Material Science;

My school also does offer an Engineering Minor in Computer and Electronics Design:
http://students.sfu.ca/calendar/engineering_science/computer_electr_design_min.html

While at it, here is what a MAJOR in Electronic Engineering requires: (in short, i have to do 5 extra first year easy class stuff + mandatory co-op for atleast 3 semesters.)
http://students.sfu.ca/calendar/engineering_science/ensc_maj_elec_eng_option.html

My delimma:

At the moment, I am 25 years old. If I complete the minor, I will be graduating in Dec of 2013. If I dont, I will graduate in Dec of 2012 in age of 26.

I personally like to do the minor simply because it could go well with my research and love for electronics and computers. But the question is, will it give me any edge when it comes to getting a job? Can i get a job as an engineer?

On the other hand, if I do the Major in Engineering as well (Double Major in Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering), I will be 28 by the time I have graduated due to mandatory 1 year long co-op. The question is, Will I have a better chance compare to minor? Will my age prevent me the job?

I guess, is it worth the Major or Minor or should I just stick with Applied Physics?


Thanks in advance
 
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  • #2
Anybody? :(
 
  • #3
In my view, if you want to work as an engineer, you're going to have a hard time unless you have an engineering degree.

Think of your question this way: do you want to be 28 and have an engineering degree, or do you want to be 28 without an engineering degree?

Your age won't be a big factor, I think, especially with the co-op.
 
  • #4
There are jobs in the semiconductor industry for applied physicists, mainly in technology development. These people push the designs of transistors and other circuit elements, making them smaller and perform better. The job never ends, because each new process node (feature shrink) requires the whole process to be done over again.

That said, there are probably 100 EEs for every applied physicist in large semiconductor companies. You'll find it much easier to get a job with an EE degree, especially a bachelor's. All of the technology development people I've known have had graduate degrees.

- Warren
 
  • #5
for any advice!

As a scientist in the field of applied physics, my advice would be to carefully consider your career goals and what you want to achieve in the industry. It is important to have a strong understanding of the specific skills and knowledge that are in demand in the semi-conductor and computer industry, as well as the job market in your area. Based on that, you can make an informed decision about whether a major or minor in electronic engineering would be beneficial for you.

In general, having a diverse skill set and knowledge base can make you a more competitive candidate for jobs in the industry. However, it is also important to consider the time and effort that will be required to complete a double major or minor, and whether that will fit into your long-term career plans.

Additionally, your age should not be a deterrent in pursuing your education and career goals. Employers value experience and a strong understanding of the field, and your age could potentially work in your favor. Ultimately, it is important to prioritize your own personal and professional development and make a decision that aligns with your goals and interests.
 

What is the best approach to solve a dilemma in the industry?

The best approach to solving a dilemma in the industry is to gather all relevant information, analyze the potential consequences of each option, and consult with experts in the field before making a decision.

How do you handle ethical dilemmas in the industry?

Ethical dilemmas in the industry should be handled by following ethical codes and guidelines set by professional organizations. It is also important to consider the impact of each option on stakeholders and to seek advice from colleagues and superiors.

What are the potential consequences of making the wrong decision in a dilemma?

The potential consequences of making the wrong decision in a dilemma can vary depending on the specific situation. It could lead to loss of trust from stakeholders, legal consequences, financial loss, or damage to the company's reputation.

How can I ensure that my decision in a dilemma is in line with industry standards?

To ensure that your decision in a dilemma is in line with industry standards, it is important to keep up-to-date with industry regulations and guidelines. Consulting with experts and seeking advice from colleagues in the industry can also help to ensure that your decision is in line with industry standards.

What role does communication play in resolving a dilemma in the industry?

Communication plays a crucial role in resolving a dilemma in the industry. It is important to communicate effectively with all stakeholders and to be transparent about the situation and the decision-making process. This can help to build trust and understanding among all parties involved.

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