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Do Commmunity College GPA's Transfer?

  1. Sep 28, 2010 #1
    I should note that I'm not expecting to transfer into any prestigious top schools. I'm thinking 3rd and 4th year classes will kill my GPA without general studies padding.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 28, 2010 #2

    fss

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    It depends almost entirely on the institution your transferring to's willingness to accept them, but in most cases yes, they will transfer.
     
  4. Sep 28, 2010 #3
    No, your GPA from a community college usually doesn't transfer to a 4 year university.
     
  5. Sep 28, 2010 #4
    Probably best to talk to your school. Looks like you are going to get a lot of conflicting answers.

    When I transferred any credits they accepted (which was almost all of them) took my gpa along with them.

    I don't know how other schools work, but I think it would be odd if a school accepted your transfer credits but no grades/gpa's with them.
     
  6. Sep 28, 2010 #5

    fss

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    Sorry, I obviously misread the post.

    I meant the credits will most likely transfer, not the GPA. I've never heard of a GPA transferring between any institutions.
     
  7. Sep 28, 2010 #6

    jtbell

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    Ditto. When we accept a course for transfer credit, we do not include the grade in the GPA that we calculate.
     
  8. Sep 28, 2010 #7
    I took a few courses at a CC and the credit, but not the grade, transfered.
     
  9. Sep 28, 2010 #8
    I have a feeling this won't look good on a medical school application...
     
  10. Sep 28, 2010 #9

    lisab

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    Not sure I follow what you mean. When you apply to med school, you have to submit transcripts from all colleges you've attended, not just the one that granted your bachelor's degree. So they'll see your community college grades.
     
  11. Sep 28, 2010 #10
    I'm basing it off the fact that 3rd and 4th year classes are harder and thus my university GPA won't be as good as those who took their general studies at the university. I may be mistaken but doesn't a, say, 3.8 university GPA sound better than a 3.9 CC GPA and a ~3.5 university GPA?
     
  12. Sep 29, 2010 #11

    fss

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    Not really sure what you expect people to tell you. If you're worried about your 3rd/4th year classes being "harder" as in "more difficult", maybe you should prepare yourself to work a bit harder to compensate. Plus, the assumption that you will have a lower GPA in your 3rd/4th year studies compared to students who spend all 4 years at the university seems a bit unfounded, at least to me.
     
  13. Sep 29, 2010 #12
    Do they factor in any of the grades people received in those transfer credits?

    Say we have two transfer students; one has all c-'s and one has all a's. Do both start at the new university with the same credits and gpa? Maybe it's because my school takes the gpa and it seems so weird to me most transfer schools don't.
     
  14. Sep 29, 2010 #13

    jtbell

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    Different schools can have different overall grading levels (i.e. different amounts of "grade inflation"). That's why most schools don't include grades from other schools when calculating their own GPA.

    When you apply to grad school or medical school or whatever, you're supposed to supply grade transcripts from each school that you've attended. The admissions committee can then see all your grades and evaluate them as they see fit. They're surely well aware that different schools sometimes give significantly different levels of grades and can take that into account if necessary.
     
  15. Sep 29, 2010 #14
    I'm pretty sure admissions boards are smart enough to check exactly which types of classes you were getting A's and B's in, and which types of classes you're getting C's in. A C in an anatomy class would be better for medical school than a B in english 101. If people could just pad out their GPA with easy classes, don't you think they would?
     
  16. Sep 29, 2010 #15

    lisab

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    They will start with the same number of credits, if they earned the same number of credits. But for both, the GPA from the old school is wiped away and they start clean at the new school.

    I'll add the same caveat most others in this thread have added: this is true for all the schools I know of; there may be an outlier school somewhere that carries the GPA over from the transfer school.
     
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