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Don't buy from tree-hating businesses

  1. Aug 22, 2008 #1
    http://www.climatecounts.org/

    Here they give businesses a score based on how environmentally friendly their practices are. It looks to me like a really good, well-meaning organization. Look how low Amazon.com and Apple scored! If these major corporations that are pervasive parts of American manufacturing and distribution of goods don't care about the environment, we are really screwed. Their website allows you to send e-mails to these companies telling that you care about climate and that they should clean up their act. I will definitely keep checking their scoreboard and try to more environmentally intelligent consumer decisions.
     
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  3. Aug 22, 2008 #2

    Evo

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    Tree hating businesses? You mean like publishing companies and booksellers?

    Your title is misleading.
     
  4. Aug 22, 2008 #3
    Libraries smell like murder.
     
  5. Aug 22, 2008 #4

    Evo

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    We "could' go back to using sheepskin. But then, what is the environmental impact of the land used by the sheep, the sheep feces, farts, the environmental issues of the feed for the sheep, transporting the sheep, processing of the skin for parchment...
     
  6. Aug 22, 2008 #5

    Math Is Hard

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    I kicked a tree this morning. :devil:
     
  7. Aug 22, 2008 #6
    I just don't mind killing trees :devil:
    I am not planning to procreate, so nothing to worry about.
     
  8. Aug 22, 2008 #7

    Evo

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    <slowly backs away from MIH>

    "No officer, I do not know this woman, all I know is that she had a crossbow, then deformed squirrels started showing up around her place..." :uhh:
     
  9. Aug 22, 2008 #8

    Math Is Hard

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    :rofl: I know you guys are saving this all for my commitment hearing.
     
  10. Aug 22, 2008 #9

    Evo

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    :rofl: Can you imagine my file?
     
  11. Aug 22, 2008 #10
    Just curious, but how could Google even be environmentally unfriendly? I feel like they'd have to make a noted effort to achieve that.
     
  12. Aug 22, 2008 #11
    The website evaluation seems ok, your title is very inappropriate IMO. It has nothing to do with the website.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2008
  13. Aug 22, 2008 #12

    Math Is Hard

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    That shipment of Ninfa's Green Sauce is on the way. o:)
     
  14. Aug 23, 2008 #13

    Moonbear

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    When using a site like that, always consider what they include in their judging criteria. If you look at their list, which is a downloadable PDF file (that annoys me to have to download instead of having them just put the text on their site), it's really not about the environmental impact a company is making, but what policies they have implemented regarding environmental impact. So, a company that is very "green" in terms of not much polluting, good at conserving resources, etc., could still rank low if they haven't spelled it all out as company policy. A company belching out all sorts of pollutants into the environment, but with a policy to monitor how much they're polluting or to reduce some of that pollution, could score more highly than a cleaner business based on the criteria used.
     
  15. Aug 23, 2008 #14

    Dale

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    If you really believe that CO2-induced global warming is today's biggest environmental problem, then it seems to me that the best thing to do would be to buy lots of durable wood products. Log cabins would be the most environmentally friendly construction because of the large amount of carbon sequestered. Similarly with paper books over e-books.
     
  16. Aug 23, 2008 #15
    I'm ALL for being 'green'---but its hard to tell a country (or the poor people) who are on the 'doorstep' of becoming industrialized 'not' to take some advantage of their natural resources ----just 'how much' is the question.

    can you imagine IF the USA was just now coming to a point of industrialization, to tell people that they can't cut down trees to make houses, furniture, and to get farmland?

    I think the USA has only about 1% of its original 'virgin' forest left and its usually considered a national treasure (except by some of the logging industry).

    We can go by 'we learned our lesson by screwing up our environment' (but in a lot of places we still are doing it)--so, a lot of those countries may 'listen' but business/'the economy' of most places (including the USA still) usually overrides things---like offshore drilling, damming rivers, etc. I think the 'snowy owl' thing is still going on.
     
  17. Aug 23, 2008 #16

    Dale

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    In terms of carbon footprint, a sustainable logging industry is probably the most "green" industry there is. They sequester an enormous amount of CO2 and then remove it from the environment.
     
  18. Aug 23, 2008 #17
    yeah...but...they usually still have to 'cut' down the original old growth to have a place to 'farm' trees
     
  19. Aug 23, 2008 #18

    Dale

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    An old growth forest no longer sequesters CO2, so from a carbon perspective old growth is not beneficial. The easiest way to remove massive amounts of CO2 from the environment is to continuously generate new biomass that is then removed from the environment. I think the logging industry is the only industry that does this.
     
  20. Aug 23, 2008 #19
    there was a segment on one PBS shows about a guy trying to 'sell' the sequestered CO2 as part of 'cap' program of the old growth forests in New Guinea (I think)

    part of what you're saying (I think) is about removing more co2, right?
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2008
  21. Aug 23, 2008 #20

    Dale

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    Yes, exactly. For example, the agricultural industry sequesters much more carbon than the logging industry, but as soon as someone metabolizes it that CO2 is released back to the atmosphere. But the carbon sequestered in wood furniture or construction lumber or even paper will stay out of the atmosphere for a long time.
     
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