Electrical Field of a Charged set of Spheres

In summary, the problem involves two spherical shells with different charges spread uniformly on their surfaces. The task is to find the magnitude of the electric field at different distances from the common center of the shells. The equation used is Gauss' Law and the key is to consider only the charge contained in the sphere at the given distance. The electric field for each sphere is calculated separately and then added together to get the total electric field. The concept may be difficult to grasp, but it involves imagining a sphere with a given radius and applying the Law to find the electric field at a specific distance.
  • #1
Snowman2526
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0

Homework Statement



Two spherical shells have a common center. A -1.37 x 10-6 C charge is spread uniformly over the inner shell, which has a radius of 0.0422 m. A +5.86 x 10-6 C charge is spread uniformly over the outer shell, which has a radius of 1.60 m. Find the magnitude of the electric field at a distance (measured from the common center) of (a) 0.200 m (b) 0.100 m, and (c) 0.025 m.


Homework Equations



Honestly I'm not sure how to set this equation up.

I have calculated the Electric Field of each sphere. the smaller is 6.92*106 and the larger is 2.06*104

I also calculated the Electric Flux each. The smaller being 6.54*104 and the larger being 6.63*105.

Now I'm not quite sure if I have to add the two spheres together, or what to do since the inside sphere is negatively charged.
 
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  • #2
This is a Gauss' Law question.
For (a) you imagine a sphere at with radius 0.2 and consider only the charge contained in it. The whole thing is spherically symmetric, so the E field will be the same everywhere on the surface of the sphere.
 
  • #3
i'm sorry to necro bump my old thread but I still cannot get this problem. When you say imagine it with the radius .2...do i add it to the radius of the two circles? or is it a fresh radius and I just plug .2 into r for my equation.

On top of that, I am sitting with two variables because I can't find out what E is. Do I add the Coulomb charge of the two spheres or combine them somehow? I'm honestly not looking for someone to do it...I just can't grasp the concept for this problem.
 
  • #4
Imagine a sphere with radius 0.2. The Law says E times the surface area of the sphere equals some constant times the charge INSIDE the sphere. So you just ignore the outer charge for part (a).
 

Related to Electrical Field of a Charged set of Spheres

1. What is an electrical field?

An electrical field is a region in space around a charged object where other charged particles will experience a force.

2. How is the electrical field of a charged set of spheres calculated?

The electrical field of a charged set of spheres can be calculated by using Coulomb's Law, which states that the force between two charged particles is proportional to the product of their charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

3. What factors affect the strength of the electrical field of a charged set of spheres?

The strength of the electrical field of a charged set of spheres is affected by the magnitude of the charges on the spheres, the distance between the spheres, and the medium in which the spheres are located.

4. How does the electrical field of a charged set of spheres change with distance?

The electrical field of a charged set of spheres follows an inverse square law, meaning that as the distance from the spheres increases, the strength of the electrical field decreases.

5. What is the unit of measurement for electrical field?

The unit of measurement for electrical field is Newtons per Coulomb (N/C) in the SI system, or Volts per meter (V/m) in the CGS system.

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