Electromagnetically Induced Transparency Molecular Atom Selectivity?

In summary, the conversation is about the possibility of having electromagnetically induced transparency on a single atom within a molecule. This involves designing beams to interact with the energy levels of the atom and creating a dark state that allows the beams to pass through the molecule. The phenomenon is real and can be applied to individual atoms within a molecule, but there may be additional considerations for atoms with long range interactions.
  • #1
jaketodd
Gold Member
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Can electromagnetically induced transparency, be effected on a single atom within a molecule?

Thanks,

Jake
 
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  • #2
In other words, can you have the electromagnetically induced transparency beams designed to interact with the energy levels of one of a molecule's atoms, and the resultant transparency allowing the beams to pass the molecule (dark state)?

Thanks,

Jake
 
  • #3
Is this a real phenomenon or are you asking if it's possible to make a single atom/molecule transparent by hitting it with...something?
I'm guessing the latter, but I want to make sure you aren't referring to some phenomenon that I am unfamiliar with and trying to apply it to a single atom.
 
  • #4
Drakkith said:
Is this a real phenomenon or are you asking if it's possible to make a single atom/molecule transparent by hitting it with...something?
I'm guessing the latter, but I want to make sure you aren't referring to some phenomenon that I am unfamiliar with and trying to apply it to a single atom.

I'm just talking about electromagnetically induced transparency applied to an atom within a molecule.
 
  • #5
Ah ok, I just looked it up and read the wiki article on it. Interesting effect.
 
  • #6
A dark state is a superposition state, which means that you can create dark states between any energy levels that can maintain coherence, in particular these can be levels that belong to an atomic transition within a molecule yes.
 
  • #7
In many experiments the gases used to demonstrate EIT are dilute gases, this means that their atoms (or molecules) behaves as individual quantum mechanical systems. Therefore the whole bussines of coherence applies to each atom individualy.

However there situations when you have long range interaction between atoms (e.g. Rydberg states) and one needs to consider additional effects.
 

Related to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency Molecular Atom Selectivity?

1. What is Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT)?

Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) is a quantum phenomenon in which the interaction of light with a medium can lead to the suppression of its absorption. This is achieved by carefully tuning the light to specific frequencies and using a control field to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms or molecules in the medium.

2. How does EIT enable molecular atom selectivity?

EIT allows for molecular atom selectivity by manipulating the energy levels of the atoms or molecules in the medium. This manipulation can be used to selectively excite certain atoms or molecules, while leaving others unaffected. This is useful in applications such as chemical analysis and precision control of chemical reactions.

3. What are the potential applications of EIT molecular atom selectivity?

The potential applications of EIT molecular atom selectivity include chemical analysis, precision control of chemical reactions, and quantum information processing. It has also been studied for potential use in quantum computing and precision sensing.

4. How is EIT molecular atom selectivity different from other selective excitation methods?

EIT molecular atom selectivity is different from other selective excitation methods because it does not require the use of external perturbations, such as magnetic fields or intense laser fields. Instead, it relies on the intrinsic properties of the medium and the precise tuning of the light to achieve selectivity.

5. What are the challenges in implementing EIT molecular atom selectivity?

Some of the challenges in implementing EIT molecular atom selectivity include the need for precise control of light and the medium, as well as the potential for interference from environmental factors. Additionally, the complexity of the systems involved can make it difficult to achieve selectivity in practical applications.

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