Essential Amino Acids - Get Your Daily Requirements

In summary, complementary protein sources in the human diet are necessary in order to get a well balanced array of amino acids. The example given is that eating beans and corn together provides a more nearly complete protein. If you are really interested, play with NAL from the USDA.
  • #1
physics_06er
25
0
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Hi there

When talking about limiting amino acids what does it really mean...
What I think it means is say we have a food eg wheat it has all the essential amino acids (aa) in it except one of them is not in the correct amount we need...does this mean that all the other aa present will not work or they will work but just limited to the limiting aa and the other amount will be degraded??--is this correct?

Also if essential aa needs are so low then would it be possible to say eat a burger (which said had 4/9 essential aa) and then say another food which had the other 5 essential aa would that be OK for the daily requirement?...so really we only have to eat a tiny bit in everyday life to get the aa??

Thanks in advance_06er
 
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  • #2
You're talking about complementary protein sources in the human diet.
Complete protein, like egg, has a well balanced array of amino acids, wheat flour does not have such a nicely balanced array... So, when you are using a poorly balanced protein as your primary protein source you need to add a different protein source that has more of the missing amino acid - example: beans and corn.

Assume humans require just three amino acids : a, b, and c.
And that a perfect protein (the usual gold standard is egg) is 10 units of a, 10 units of b, and 10 units of c.

Then when you eat protein that is a-1 b-10 c-10, you are short on a.
But if you also eat protein at the same time a source that is a-8 b-1 c-1, you get a more nearly complete protein intake.

If you are really interested, play with NAL from the USDA. The data in it is sometimes used to construct those "nutrition labels" for foods sold in the US and elsewhere, when the company packaging the food doesn't have access to a nutrition analysis laboratory.

http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/
 
  • #3
Hi

Thanks fo rthe reply
But say you eat protein that is a-1 b-10 c-10, would 'b' and 'c' still "work"
 
  • #4
Yes, the amino acids you get will "work" for making proteins that only require those and the non-essential amino acids, and a small percentage of the ones you are deficient in will be made. But, unused amino acids don't linger around, so you can't eat half of them today and the other half tomorrow and be okay. You need to have all of them in your diet each day to build all the proteins you need for normal body function.
 
  • #5
Moonbears example is a good reason why most Vegans look like crap.. especially the athletes.

it is EXTREMELY difficult to get enough protein without animal products. Prior to the industrial age it would have been impossible.
 

Related to Essential Amino Acids - Get Your Daily Requirements

1. What are essential amino acids?

Essential amino acids are a group of nine amino acids that the human body cannot produce on its own. These amino acids must be obtained through the diet in order for the body to function properly.

2. What are the benefits of getting enough essential amino acids?

Essential amino acids play a crucial role in many bodily functions, including building and repairing tissues, producing hormones and enzymes, and supporting the immune system. They are also important for maintaining muscle mass and promoting healthy growth and development.

3. How can I ensure I am getting my daily requirements of essential amino acids?

The best way to ensure you are getting enough essential amino acids is by consuming a well-balanced diet that includes a variety of protein sources such as meat, fish, eggs, dairy, and plant-based proteins like beans and legumes. You can also consider taking a supplement specifically designed to provide all nine essential amino acids.

4. What happens if I don't get enough essential amino acids?

If you consistently do not get enough essential amino acids, your body may experience negative effects such as muscle loss, fatigue, weakened immune system, and slower wound healing. It is important to make sure you are meeting your daily requirements.

5. Can I get all nine essential amino acids from plant-based sources?

While plant-based sources do not typically contain all nine essential amino acids, consuming a variety of plant-based proteins can provide a complete amino acid profile. Combining different protein sources, such as beans and rice, can also help ensure you are getting all nine essential amino acids.

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