European Southern Observatory (Event Horizon Project team) – picture of Sgr A*

In summary: This article discusses the findings of the EHT.The accretion disk of Sgr A* is shaped more like a puffed-up doughnut than a flat pancake. This fattened shape means that the disk supplies the black hole with scraps of matter at a leisurely pace, which makes it relatively dim compared with other, greedier black holes.
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pinball1970
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TL;DR Summary
The results are from the Event Horizon Telescope project which was responsible for producing the first-ever image of a black hole in 2019.
A conference will be streamed about the findings online on 12 May 2022 at 15:00 CEST (13:00 UTC, 9:00 EST), followed by a YouTube event with six astronomers from around the world. Press releases will include "extensive supporting audiovisual material"
This alert regarding an announcement from the European Southern Observatory – announcement 12th May

The results are from the Even Horizon Telescope project which was responsible for producing the first-ever image of a black hole in 2019.

The video of that announcement is in the link. Worth seeing.

It has been an exciting couple of weeks, Hubble images of the oldest star ever imaged, Webb about to start and this project.

https://www.sciencealert.com/astron...ke-a-massive-announcement-about-the-milky-way
 
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Astronomy news on Phys.org
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This is the youtube link to the ESO announcement



They use the word "ground breaking!"

Cheers
EDIT: 13.5.22. They have changed the video link from the actual live announcement yesterday (12th May) to a compact explanation. The announcement will be on line somewhere.
 
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I'll be honest, the image was 'similar' not sure what I expected. Perhaps an image like something from 'Interstellar!'
What was great was the description of the collaboration, 100s of scientists country wide, a global effort.
They mentioned this in 2019 too, this is what can be achieved when all the politics is removed. Even more pertinent now. Anyway @mfb has a thread that will discuss the mechanics. I just wanted pretty pictures!
 
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That's a good image.
 
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Sagittarius A-Star said:
That's a good image.
Avatar quality, no doubt.
 
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pinball1970 said:
I just wanted pretty pictures!
When EHT (viewing conditions permitting) and JWST get together, you will see some pretty pictures, I have no doubt of that.
https://webbtelescope.org/contents/news-releases/2021/news-2021-053.html

With s55 at Perihelion to Sag A later this year, it seems like a good time to study some physics. I understand that interaction is of keen interest in certain circles.
 
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She spent a lot of time on this one.
 
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Sam Gregson and Dan Wilkins talk about the image.
 
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Oldman too said:
When EHT (viewing conditions permitting) and JWST get together, you will see some pretty pictures
For my avatar, the current image resolution is sufficient.
 
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Sagittarius A-Star said:
For my avatar, the current image resolution is sufficient.
Hi, your correct, it's a perfect avatar image,resolution and all. I was just mentioning your user name and the avatar made a very nice complimentary match. My post #6 was a reply to @pinball1970 mentioning that he just wanted pretty pictures.
 
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This video describes, how the image of Sgr A* was made:

 
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Interesting info being released already, it seems Sag-A is a nibbler when it comes to it's accretion disk.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01462-z

"Their data show that the accretion disk is shaped more like a puffed-up doughnut than a flat pancake. This fattened shape means that the disk supplies the black hole with scraps of matter at a leisurely pace, which makes it relatively dim compared with other, greedier black holes."
 

Related to European Southern Observatory (Event Horizon Project team) – picture of Sgr A*

1. What is the European Southern Observatory (ESO)?

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is an international research organization that operates some of the world's most advanced ground-based telescopes. It is funded by 16 member countries, including most of the European Union, and is headquartered in Garching, Germany.

2. What is the Event Horizon Project team?

The Event Horizon Project team is a group of international scientists and researchers working together to capture the first-ever image of a black hole. The team is led by the European Southern Observatory and includes members from various institutions and organizations around the world.

3. What is Sgr A*?

Sgr A* (pronounced "Sagittarius A-star") is a supermassive black hole located at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. It has a mass equivalent to about 4 million times that of our Sun and is surrounded by a disk of gas and dust that is being pulled into the black hole's event horizon.

4. How was the picture of Sgr A* captured?

The picture of Sgr A* was captured using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a network of radio telescopes around the world that work together to create a virtual telescope the size of the Earth. The EHT collected data from Sgr A* and other black holes over several days in April 2017, and the data was then processed and analyzed by the Event Horizon Project team to create the historic image.

5. Why is the picture of Sgr A* important?

The picture of Sgr A* is important because it provides visual evidence of the existence of black holes, which have long been predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity but have never been directly observed. It also allows scientists to study the extreme physics and behavior of black holes, which can help us better understand the universe and the laws of physics.

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