Exploring Cavity Magnetrons for Energy Research

  • Thread starter Charles Bagwell
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In summary, cavity magnetrons are an important tool for energy research due to their ability to generate high-frequency electromagnetic waves. These waves are used in a variety of applications, including radar systems and particle accelerators. By exploring the design and operation of cavity magnetrons, researchers can improve their efficiency and effectiveness in generating and controlling electromagnetic radiation. This technology has the potential to significantly impact the field of energy research and contribute to advancements in various industries.
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Charles Bagwell
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I am a retired Nuclear Engineer with a Senior Reactor Operator certification On 1150 MW General Electric Boiling water Reactors. I also operated a 3,000 MW Coal fired power plant for DTE Energy. (Detroit Edison). I started my Energy training as a E-5 Boiler operator for the US Navy in the Vietnam war era.

For over 50 years I have been investigating exotic energy systems, to find the most energy efficient ones to install in my home, working toward a “Zero” net energy bill from the local electric utility every month. I finally achieved that goal four years ago, with the installation of 12 kw of ground mounted Solar panels. I sell the Electricity they produce to my local Electric Utility at a premium price, which offsets my all electric home’s energy usage.

To help get me to a net “zero” usage, I installed a three ton “Geothermal closed loop heat-pump system operating with a COP of 5.

Also, for the last five years I have been experimenting with Electromagnetic devices to make steam for a three horse power steam engine/generator in my basement shop. Toward that end, I discovered this Physics Review website and a discussion thread on magnetron microwave production.

My goal is to retrofit a standard kitchen microwave oven to produce 7 scfm of 100 psi steam to run the engine. But first, I need to understand the complete workings of a cavity magnetron tube.
 
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Welcome to the PF. :smile:

That's quite a background! If you want help with some of the efficiency calculations or similar, the Mechanical Engineering forum is probably a good place to post for now. We also have a DIY forum, which might also be a good place for some of your posts.

Enjoy the PF! :smile:
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Welcome to the PF. :smile:

That's quite a background! If you want help with some of the efficiency calculations or similar, the Mechanical Engineering forum is probably a good place to post for now. We also have a DIY forum, which might also be a good place for some of your posts.

Enjoy the PF! :smile:

Thank you for the information, Looking forward to learning a lot on this forum. Sorry for breaking the rules and receiving a warning for solicitation of an open source project collaboration offer. It was an accident on my part and will not happen again. It looks like Electrical Engineering has a lot of threads on magnetrons. I will peruse those posts and go from there.
 
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