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Former Chicago police officer wants his job back

  1. Feb 16, 2010 #1
    Anthony Abbate was convicted of felony assault and battery after a Feb 2007 incident where he severely beat a female bartender who had asked him to leave. He received a two year suspended sentence and was fired. Now he wants his job back. Should he get it?

    http://chicagoist.com/2010/01/13/anthony_abbate_to_judge_gimme_a_sec.php
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2010 #2
    nah, there's other things he could be doing

    highest-paying-dirty-job-1.jpg
     
  4. Feb 16, 2010 #3
    what do you think...
     
  5. Feb 16, 2010 #4
    I think he should have served prison time. As for for re-instating him, it should be out of the question, but as the article suggests, he may have a legal case!
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2010
  6. Feb 16, 2010 #5

    lisab

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    If he does get his job back, I can't imagine his supervisors would risk putting him in contact with the public.
     
  7. Feb 16, 2010 #6
    Felons can be cops??
     
  8. Feb 16, 2010 #7

    turbo

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    He should never again be in an official position in any public-safety field. Period.
     
  9. Feb 16, 2010 #8
    He deserves to be homeless for the rest of his life.
    Not only should he not have any power over anything, it scares me that there's more cops out there just like him, using their badge as a get out of jail free card.

    Cops shouldn't be given leniency on committing crimes. They should even be punished more harshly than other people. If I attack you, you can defend yourself. If a cop attacks you, what do you do?
     
  10. Feb 16, 2010 #9
    It gets worse. The Police wanted to file misdemeanor charges, but the DA stepped in and elevated the charges. The bar tender was the second person he assaulted that day at that location. Abbate was a 12 year veteran and was known to be violent and drink excessively.

    As far as his legal case; I didn't think a convicted felon could become (or remain) a police officer. However, his lawyers obviously wouldn't be wasting their time unless there was something to be gained: if not reinstatement, possibly some kind of settlement. Lawyers don't work for nothing. Possibly they're being paid by the PBA (police union).

    It's been said that in some places, cold nuclear fusion is easier than removing a veteran public service employee.

    http://cbs2chicago.com/topstories/Chicago.Police.Anthony.2.335957.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  11. Feb 16, 2010 #10

    Chi Meson

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    This is unfair to all the decent refuse collectors out there!
     
  12. Feb 16, 2010 #11
    actually, it's kind of funny. the web page where i found that listed garbage collection as one of the top 10 best paying "dirty jobs". probably has to be a government job though, most of the collection here has been replaced with private companies.
     
  13. Feb 17, 2010 #12
    He shouldn't even be considered for a job in any kind of law enforcement job, even mall cop should be out of the question for him. If you're a convicted felon you lose your right to own or possess a firearm. Maybe they could issue him a nerf gun if he does get his job back.
     
  14. Feb 17, 2010 #13

    turbo

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    He probably wants reinstatement in some sort of desk job so that he can hold onto his heath insurance and retirement benefits. Still, would anybody want to know that an unstable individual was working as a 911 dispatcher, trainer, or other public-safety job? Not me. He had his chance and blew it badly.
     
  15. Feb 17, 2010 #14

    cronxeh

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    Actually, from the same website I would recommend Dirty Job #1: Crime Scene Cleaner. He would get to be close to his cop buddies, and make himself useful at the same time. The pay isnt too shabby either - $75,000.
     
  16. Feb 17, 2010 #15

    cronxeh

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    Most felony convictions will prevent you from getting a public safety job, but upon your request they can review your case individually. I'm not sure if you guys would want an ex-felon who did home roberries working in EMS. Afterall, its not just what the public safety guys get to see in your house, its also access to your date of birth, SSN#, home address, etc.

    Lets see, in last 5 years I've seen over 8000 patients. Thats access to over 8000 different date of births, social security numbers, home addresses, etc.
     
  17. Feb 17, 2010 #16

    Chi Meson

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    "Private companies," right! Around here, private sanitation companies means ... you know, Sopranos, right? And if the towns handle sanitation, they then transfer it to, guess who? And whenever budgets are squeezed, guess what always seems to be "off the table"?
     
  18. Feb 17, 2010 #17
    there's NO way he should get his job back! that would be ludicrous!
     
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