Genetics of Bacteria mutagenic treatment question

In summary: Treatment with a deaminating agent like nitrous acidb. Treatment with an alkylating agent like MMSc. Treatment by exposure to UVd. Exposure to excess superoxide radicalse. Treatment with a base analog like 2-aminopurineAll but one of the treatments will damage the DNA of the bacteria whether the cell is dividing or not. Only one of those will not cause changes to the DNA when the cells are not replicating, but will cause copying errors during DNA replication.
  • #1
outxbreak
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Q: Which of the following mutagenic treatments would be least effective in creating a mutation in non-replicating cells? Explain your choice.
a. Treatment with a deaminating agent like nitrous acid
b. Treatment with an alkylating agent like MMS
c. Treatment by exposure to UV
d. Exposure to excess superoxide radicals
e. Treatment with a base analog like 2-aminopurine





I said:
a. Treatment with a deaminating agent like nitrous acid
Deamination causes base pair changes so mutants arise after replication

b. Treatment with an alkylating agent like MMS
Alkylating bases mispair.. problem for replicating cells

c. Treatment by exposure to UV

d. UV causes pyrimidine dimmers. DNA pol cannot replicate through a dimer so lethal to cells if not repaired

e. Exposure to excess superoxide radicals
8-oxoG mispairs with adenine

f. Treatment with a base analog like 2-aminopurine
potent mutagen that causes G:T and T:G misicorporations, i.e., it is also a transition mutagen.


So the problem is that all of them really just cause mismatches.. which means none would be effective for non-replicating cells? What am I missing? :/
 
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  • #2
outxbreak said:
Q: Which of the following mutagenic treatments would be least effective in creating a mutation in non-replicating cells? Explain your choice.
a. Treatment with a deaminating agent like nitrous acid
b. Treatment with an alkylating agent like MMS
c. Treatment by exposure to UV
d. Exposure to excess superoxide radicals
e. Treatment with a base analog like 2-aminopurine


I said:
a. Treatment with a deaminating agent like nitrous acid
Deamination causes base pair changes so mutants arise after replication

b. Treatment with an alkylating agent like MMS
Alkylating bases mispair.. problem for replicating cells

c. Treatment by exposure to UV

d. UV causes pyrimidine dimmers. DNA pol cannot replicate through a dimer so lethal to cells if not repaired

e. Exposure to excess superoxide radicals
8-oxoG mispairs with adenine

f. Treatment with a base analog like 2-aminopurine
potent mutagen that causes G:T and T:G misicorporations, i.e., it is also a transition mutagen.So the problem is that all of them really just cause mismatches.. which means none would be effective for non-replicating cells? What am I missing? :/

I think you are missing thinking about how a mutagenesis experiment would normally be done.

At the moment the experiment is done the cells, in this case we are told, are not growing. But afterwards the mutants are not detected by looking at each cell, one by one, and if so how would the mutation be detected? We have to assume that after the treatment the mutagenic agent is removed and then the cells are grown without and probably plated out on a selective medium (or just plated out immediately after the mutagenic treatment and then they grow from single cells to visible colonies) to detect the mutants.

You probably have an account of such experiments in your textbook.

I think you should look again at each case with that in mind.
 
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  • #3
All but one of those treatments will damage the DNA of the bacteria whether the cell is dividing or not. Only one of those will not cause changes to the DNA when the cells are not replicating, but will cause copying errors during DNA replication.
 
  • #4
I'm guessing that is the UV damage? Thanks!
 
  • #5
Although DNA polymerase III (the polymerase responsible for most DNA replication in bacteria) cannot synthesize past the pyrimidine dimers, bacteria contain other DNA polymerases (e.g. DNA pol IV and DNA pol V) that can perform translesion synthesis and bypass thymine dimers.
 
  • #6
outxbreak said:
I'm guessing that is the UV damage? Thanks!

Think again - the answer is more simple and self-evident and no need to guess, at least if you know what these various agents do.
 
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  • #7
We seem to have lost the OP. This is a very simple question. There are thes various and complicated mechanisms to avoid or make good the damage, but in one of the cases there wouldn't be any damage in non-growing cells.
 
  • #8
I don't really know the answer. It makes since that UV could be repaired by other enzymes.. sorry I don't see how it's so "simple".
 
  • #9
outxbreak said:
I don't really know the answer. It makes since that UV could be repaired by other enzymes.. sorry I don't see how it's so "simple".

Forget about repair. Repair does not come into this. How does the DNA get damaged in the first place? Go through each case. How does growth, replication, come into it?
 
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  • #10
I read my book again and the only thing I can imagine is that oxidation does not happen to the non-growing cells.. :/
 
  • #11
Imagine you have purified DNA in a test tube. Expose that DNA to each of the five mutagens from the question. Which of these mutagens will chemically alter the DNA in the test tube (here it's useful to think of the chemistry of how each mutagen alters the DNA), and which ones will not?
 
  • #12
I have given up on this problem!

Thanks anyways
 
  • #13
The ethos of this site is we do not do the homework for the students. Problems may involve a series of stages and our help often consists in splitting the problem up into stages, which I and Ygggdrasil have tried to do, and then asking back about the first step, etc.. Then without seeing an attempt by you to e.g. answer Ygggdrasil's last question we also must abandon it.
 
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  • #14
Yeah I would have deleted this board but Idk how.
 

Related to Genetics of Bacteria mutagenic treatment question

1. What is the purpose of using mutagenic treatment on bacteria?

Mutagenic treatment is used on bacteria to induce mutations in their genetic material. This can help scientists study the effects of mutations on bacterial traits and understand the genetic mechanisms of bacterial evolution.

2. How is mutagenic treatment performed on bacteria?

Mutagenic treatment can be performed using various techniques, such as exposure to chemicals, UV radiation, or high-energy particles. These treatments cause mutations in the bacterial DNA, which can be studied and analyzed by scientists.

3. What are the potential risks of using mutagenic treatment on bacteria?

The use of mutagenic treatment on bacteria can result in unintended mutations that may have negative effects on the bacteria's survival or function. Additionally, there is a possibility of the mutated bacteria becoming resistant to the treatment, making it less effective in the future.

4. Can mutagenic treatment be used on all types of bacteria?

Mutagenic treatment can be used on most types of bacteria, but the effectiveness may vary depending on the bacterial species and their genetic makeup. Some bacteria may be more resistant to mutagenic treatment, while others may be more susceptible.

5. How do scientists analyze the results of mutagenic treatment on bacteria?

Scientists can analyze the results of mutagenic treatment on bacteria by studying the changes in the bacteria's genetic material and comparing it to the original DNA. They can also observe any changes in bacterial traits or behaviors to understand the effects of the induced mutations.

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