Gravity's Effects on Aqueous Foams - Discussion & Experiments

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In summary, the conversation discussed the effects of gravity on aqueous foams and the experiments being conducted in micro-g using parabolic flight missions. It was mentioned that surface tension plays a larger role in foam formation than gravity. A link to a website with more information on foams was shared, along with a publication on foaming experiments. The speaker also mentioned that they are currently evaluating their measurements and hope to have more detailed results in the future.
  • #1
Telmerk
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Dear all,

What do you think, how the gravity effects on the structure of aqueous foams?
I' ve just made a series of http://www.admatis.com" , Bremen, Germany.
There are a lot of experiments available in micro-g, using parabolic flight missions.

I would be happy to discuss with you the recent results and the open questions!
 
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  • #2
I know nothing about such stuff, and unfortunately can't understand the first link, but it looks fascinating. I'll certainly monitor this thread.
 
  • #3
I would guess that gravity plays only a small role in foam formation, because surface tension is far greater of a force in this situtation and the mass of the foam surfaces is small.

I was surmise that gravity only has a settling effect.
 
  • #4
Danger said:
I know nothing about such stuff, and unfortunately can't understand the first link, but it looks fascinating. I'll certainly monitor this thread.
In case you didn't find the English versions, it's here. Not the whole site is also in English.
 
  • #5
Sorry

Dear PhysicsForumers,

I am sorry that I answer so late. I think quinn is right, we can expect that gravity level has a small effect (but it do have some!) on foam evolution because the effect of gravity is proportional to the mass, and foams have small mass.
Here is a little article about foams, (sorry for my bad English.:frown: ) see the attachment. It will appear on the website (with pictures) I linked in the http://www.admatis.com" . For starting, one of the best article about the physics of foams is the so called Making, Measuring and Modelling Foams, by Denis Weairie and Stefan Hutzler, Europhysics News, May/June 1999.

A lot of experiments has been carried out in micro-g, to obstruct the gravity-driven drainage, and to achieve stable foam structures even from materials that are unstable on Earth. we tried out, what happens in macro-g. We could not measure the cell wall thickness inside the foam, we only monitored the foam heights. We expected that with increasing gravity levels it is more difficult to create foams. :bugeye:
It is true. See the the plot below, made from raw data. I am looking forward to evaluate all of our measurements and to clarify the effect of macro-g.
Hopefully, there will be detailed results within a few months.. :rolleyes:

Kind regards,
T, the Magician
 

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  • #6
Some new material

Hi, dear Forumers and Foamers,

There is a new publication about the above mentioned foaming experiments at the http://www.zarm.uni-bremen.de" home page. Check it out, if you have some free time! Follow: Facilities/Centrifuge/Application/Scientific Applications

Regards,

T.
 
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Related to Gravity's Effects on Aqueous Foams - Discussion & Experiments

What is gravity and how does it affect aqueous foams?

Gravity is a fundamental force of nature that causes objects with mass to be attracted to each other. In the case of aqueous foams, gravity affects the stability and structure of the foam. The force of gravity pulls the liquid molecules in the foam downwards, causing the foam to collapse and lose its shape.

What are some common experiments used to study the effects of gravity on aqueous foams?

Some common experiments used to study the effects of gravity on aqueous foams include tilting the foam, measuring the drainage rate of the liquid, and observing the changes in foam structure over time. Other experiments may involve altering the surface tension or adding different substances to the foam to see how it affects the foam's stability under the influence of gravity.

How does the concentration of dissolved substances in the foam affect its response to gravity?

The concentration of dissolved substances, such as surfactants, can greatly affect the stability of aqueous foams under the influence of gravity. Higher concentrations of surfactants can strengthen the foam's structure and make it more resistant to collapsing under the force of gravity. On the other hand, lower concentrations of surfactants can lead to a weaker and less stable foam that is more susceptible to the effects of gravity.

Can gravity be counteracted to create a stable aqueous foam?

Yes, it is possible to counteract the effects of gravity on aqueous foams by adding substances that can increase the foam's surface tension, such as polymers or proteins. These substances can help strengthen the foam's structure and prevent it from collapsing under the force of gravity, creating a more stable foam.

How can the study of gravity's effects on aqueous foams be applied in real-world applications?

The study of gravity's effects on aqueous foams has many potential applications, such as in the production of food and beverages, where foams are commonly used. Understanding how gravity affects the stability of foams can also be applied in industries such as cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and oil recovery, where foams play a crucial role. This research can also help in the development of new materials and technologies that can withstand the effects of gravity in various environments.

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