How are Fermions formed from energy?

In summary: Please do not post any more of these summaries.In summary, the conversation discusses the formation of matter from energy and the concept of a "Planck Energy Block" or "Planck Block" as the smallest unit of energy. However, it is stated that these assumptions are not valid and that an electron cannot be broken down into smaller units of energy. The conversation is then closed, with a request to not continue discussing this topic.
  • #1
DrDoc
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TL;DR Summary
So, if E=mc^2, then matter is formed from a lot of energy. So, how is energy organized to form a fermion? Are there energy "building blocks".
We all know that matter is formed from energy. I am wondering how that is done. I am assuming there is some smallest unit of energy, which I will call a "Planck Energy Block" or "Planck Block". I am also assuming these Planck Blocks may be arranged in different ways to form fermions. I do not know if there is only a single type of Planck Block or several types. I am hoping people can help me think this through.

Thanks,
Larry
 
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  • #2
DrDoc said:
Summary:: So, if E=mc^2, then matter is formed from a lot of energy. So, how is energy organized to form a fermion? Are there energy "building blocks".

We all know that matter is formed from energy. I am wondering how that is done. I am assuming there is some smallest unit of energy, which I will call a "Planck Energy Block" or "Planck Block". I am also assuming these Planck Blocks may be arranged in different ways to form fermions. I do not know if there is only a single type of Planck Block or several types. I am hoping people can help me think this through.

Thanks,
Larry

An electron is a elementary particle. It cannot be broken down any further. There are no Planck energy blocks involved.
 
  • #3
Making up your own terminology in physics is a terrible idea. In general energy is not quantized the way you seem to think it is.

EDIT: I see perok beat me to it.
 
  • #4
PeroK said:
An electron is a elementary particle. It cannot be broken down any further. There are no Planck energy blocks involved.
But it is a "particle" and has it's identity by the way the energy which comprises it is arranged. Do you disagree with this?
 
  • #5
DrDoc said:
But it is a "particle" and has it's identity by the way the energy which comprises it is arranged. Do you disagree with this?
An electron is not an "arrangement of energy" in any way way that makes sense. It has a rest mass, a charge and spin 1/2. That's what identifies it as an electron.
 
  • #6
DrDoc said:
I am assuming there is some smallest unit of energy, which I will call a "Planck Energy Block" or "Planck Block". I am also assuming these Planck Blocks may be arranged in different ways to form fermions.
Neither of these assumptions are valid, so no conclusion drawn from them will be valid either.

This thread is closed.
 
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1. How is energy converted into fermions?

Fermions are formed from energy through a process called pair production, where a high energy photon interacts with a nucleus or another particle, creating a particle-antiparticle pair. The energy of the photon is converted into the mass of the fermions through this process.

2. What are the properties of fermions formed from energy?

Fermions formed from energy have half-integer spin and follow the Pauli exclusion principle, meaning that no two fermions can have the same quantum state. They also have mass and interact through the fundamental forces of nature.

3. Can fermions be formed from any type of energy?

Yes, fermions can be formed from any type of energy as long as it is high enough to overcome the energy threshold for pair production. This threshold is typically in the range of a few megaelectronvolts (MeV).

4. How are fermions and antifermions related to each other?

Fermions and antifermions are related as particle-antiparticle pairs. They have the same mass and spin, but opposite electric charge and other quantum numbers. When a fermion and an antifermion collide, they can annihilate each other, releasing their energy in the form of photons.

5. How do fermions formed from energy contribute to the structure of matter?

Fermions formed from energy are the building blocks of matter. They make up the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of atoms, as well as the electrons that surround the nucleus. The interactions between fermions are what give matter its properties and structure.

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