How do classical and quantum mesh?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of de Broglie wavelength and its relevance in physics class. The wavelength of an average human is found to be ridiculously small, but when applied to an electric current in an exposed wire, it results in a wavelength of 36.3215m and a frequency of 8.2369 MHz. This is similar to the RF of remote control cars and AM/FM frequencies. The conversation also touches on the idea of using a tuner to manipulate this wavelength and the correct pronunciation of de Broglie.
  • #1
I have a question for the enlightened minds.

In physics class we found our debrouille (sp?) wavelength, we found that an average human gives a ridiculously small wavelength. H/p. Now what happens when you do this to an electric current in an exposed wire? (6.626E(-34) m2 kg / s)/(9.11E(-31)*(0.0002 m/s) (the speed electrons flow in a wire, but this can be changed). But that gives you a wavelength of 36.3215m and a frequency of 8.2369 MHz. This is pretty close to the RF of remote control cars, and in between AM/FM frequencies. Would there be a way to this up through a tuner of some sort? Or is this how the technology behind radio transmissions works?
 
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  • #2
de Broglie, which is roughly pronounced the way you spelled it.

The waves you are referring to are classical electromagnetic waves, not matter waves. The electrons in traveling in a current exhibit two types of velocities, one being their own, individual velocity, and the other being their drift velocity. Basically electrons scatter off of impurities and other electrons in a metal, so even though they are going rediculously fast, their average displacement ends up being very small (that's the drift velocity).

I think that if you did the calculation with their true velocity (in between scattering) then you would get a de Broglie wavelength that is much much smaller.
 
  • #3
lbrits said:
de Broglie, which is roughly pronounced the way you spelled it.

Actually, I believe its pronounced "debroy".
 
  • #4
True, I meant the way he spelled it, not I =)
But yes, that is the proper rendition.
 

1. How do classical and quantum mechanics differ?

Classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are two different theories used to describe the behavior of particles and objects. Classical mechanics is based on the laws of motion and describes the behavior of macroscopic objects, while quantum mechanics is based on the principles of quantum theory and describes the behavior of microscopic particles.

2. Can classical and quantum mechanics be reconciled?

There is ongoing research and debate about whether classical and quantum mechanics can be reconciled. Some scientists believe that a unified theory, such as string theory, may be able to reconcile the two theories, while others believe that they may simply be different ways of looking at the same phenomena.

3. How do classical and quantum mechanics overlap?

Classical and quantum mechanics overlap in some areas, such as the behavior of large particles or objects that have both classical and quantum properties. This is known as the classical limit, where classical mechanics can be used to describe the behavior of particles that are not small enough to exhibit quantum behavior.

4. How does the uncertainty principle apply to classical and quantum mechanics?

The uncertainty principle, which states that the position and momentum of a particle cannot be known simultaneously, applies to both classical and quantum mechanics. However, its effects are more noticeable in the quantum realm, where particles can exist in multiple states at once.

5. How do classical and quantum mechanics impact our understanding of the universe?

Classical and quantum mechanics have greatly shaped our understanding of the universe, from the laws of motion and gravity to the behavior of particles at the subatomic level. They continue to be studied and applied in various fields, providing insight into the fundamental workings of our world.

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