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How does thrust work?

  1. Aug 30, 2006 #1
    How does thrust work? Another question about top gun, I did some research on the F-14 tomcat and the Max takeoff weight: 72,900 lb, how does this relate to the amount of thrust needed. The turbofans generate 13,810 lbf dry, 27,800 lbf with afterburner (72 kN / 126 kN) each. I don't understand this..I'm extremely new to all this and would be extremely helpful if you can solve thie predicament for me
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 30, 2006 #2
    Remember that the weight acts downward and thrust acts horizontally. The given thrust, F, will accelerate the plane. The amount of acceleration will depend on the takeoff weight.
     
  4. Aug 30, 2006 #3
    Thrust

    Civil dude mentioned the force components of the airplane, and lift may be your question focus?
    I have a large book on the tomcat and recall within it that the F-14 can resume flight with much of one wing gone, but it is not with me currently to cite properly.
    This NASA link: http://www.lerc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/thrust1.html describes thrust as force, however, I am curious about how effective low bypass turbines (on many high performance military aircraft) are at low vehicle speed (that is takeoff) with respect to high bypass ratios (think of airliner turbines) for takeoff conditions. Also, note that the tomcat is naval and may be used with steam catapult assistance for short runway lengths on aircraft carriers.

    Hope this helps.
     
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