How would Dr. Frankenstein solve the tissue rejection problem?

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This is a playful hypothetical question that might be part of a fantasy story someday.

Let's assume that the famous and fictional Dr. Frankenstein really could reanimate the body he sewed together. Let's also assume that any mad scientist who could reanimate corpses would also have at the very least modern medical insight, although his equipment would still be that of a 19th century medical researcher.

Given this scenario, how would Dr. Frankenstein address the inevitable tissue rejection that would occur between the sewn-together parts of the Monster's body? Also, what would be some side effects of the rejection-stopping method that Dr. Frankenstein used?
 

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  • #3
anorlunda
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Maybe itching and irritation caused by tissue rejection is what made the monster have such a bad disposition. :wink:
 
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  • #4
hutchphd
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Don't forget the electrodes in his neck....that couldn't be comfortable.
 
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  • #5
256bits
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His shoes were too tight, causing stress all the way up. Shin bone connected to the knee bone, knee bone connected to ..... neck bone connected to the head bone... connected to a splitting migraine headache.
 
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  • #6
nsaspook
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I suspect marital issues as the root cause for all monster problems.
bride_frankenstein_1935_21-1487460005-726x388.jpg
 
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This is a playful hypothetical question that might be part of a fantasy story someday.

Let's assume that the famous and fictional Dr. Frankenstein really could reanimate the body he sewed together. Let's also assume that any mad scientist who could reanimate corpses would also have at the very least modern medical insight, although his equipment would still be that of a 19th century medical researcher.

Given this scenario, how would Dr. Frankenstein address the inevitable tissue rejection that would occur between the sewn-together parts of the Monster's body? Also, what would be some side effects of the rejection-stopping method that Dr. Frankenstein used?
Get Messmer to induce an intense hypnotic trance with the suggestion of compatible tissues.
 
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Vanadium 50
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I suspect marital issues as the root cause for all monster problems.

 
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how would Dr. Frankenstein address the inevitable tissue rejection that would occur between the sewn-together parts of the Monster's body?

I believe the application of Handwavium has an excellent track record in situations like these. Just make sure there is no potential for dramatic irony in the creature's unexpected self destruction.
 
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  • #10
pinball1970
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This is a playful hypothetical question that might be part of a fantasy story someday.

Let's assume that the famous and fictional Dr. Frankenstein really could reanimate the body he sewed together. Let's also assume that any mad scientist who could reanimate corpses would also have at the very least modern medical insight, although his equipment would still be that of a 19th century medical researcher.

Given this scenario, how would Dr. Frankenstein address the inevitable tissue rejection that would occur between the sewn-together parts of the Monster's body? Also, what would be some side effects of the rejection-stopping method that Dr. Frankenstein used?
I cannot remember which parts of the monster were from where, the head was separate from the torso?

The immune system is not located to one part of the body so you have a very mixed and confused response assuming everything now sewn together worked as pervious.

A quick check on google https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/the-immune-system

Adenoids. Two glands located at the back of the nasal passage.

Bone marrow. The soft, spongy tissue found in bone cavities.

Lymph nodes. Small organs shaped like beans, which are located throughout the body and connect via the lymphatic vessels.

Lymphatic vessels. A network of channels throughout the body that carries lymphocytes to the lymphoid organs and bloodstream.

Peyer's patches. Lymphoid tissue in the small intestine.

Spleen. A fist-sized organ located in the abdominal cavity.

Thymus. Two lobes that join in front of the trachea behind the breastbone.

Tonsils. Two oval masses in the back of the throat.

So as a non Dr I would probably give him a cocktail of immunosuppressants but have the kit ready to reanimate him again if that did not work.
 
  • #11
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the head was separate from the torso?
Isn't that what the bolts in the neck were for?

Of course the Shelley and Hollywood versions are quite different.
 
  • #12
pinball1970
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Isn't that what the bolts in the neck were for?

Of course the Shelley and Hollywood versions are quite different.
Just had a look on google, blew the image up.

Yes but if the bolt is supposed to hold the head on, surely the nut should be right against the bone?

Not on the outside like that?
 
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Hollywood
 
  • #15
pinball1970
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  • #16
Klystron
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The answer to the original question of the thread is straightforward: Doc Frankenstein zaps the creature with electricity from lightning. When your only useful tool is a hammer, all problems resemble nails.

Here's a story about a freaky real-life "head transplant" experiment

https://www.newscientist.com/articl...arried-out-on-monkey-claims-maverick-surgeon/

Hollywood
Or add severed heads to a living body as in "The Thing with Two Heads".

Follow up Doctor Frankenstein question: If Doc F. reanimates sewn together dead body parts by zapping them with electricity thereby creating a powerful monster, what happens if he applies the same technique to a living person?
 
  • #17
pinball1970
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The answer to the original question of the thread is straightforward: Doc Frankenstein zaps the creature with electricity from lightning. When your only useful tool is a hammer, all problems resemble nails.




Or add severed heads to a living body as in "The Thing with Two Heads".

Follow up Doctor Frankenstein question: If Doc F. reanimates sewn together dead body parts by zapping them with electricity thereby creating a powerful monster, what happens if he applies the same technique to a living person?
Zapping a living person with electricity can turn them into a dead person....(joke)

This thread though for me has raised a relevant point. Sci fi based on Science that is a little out there but nascent rather than crazy is far more entertaining than just plain crazy.
I loved the Frankenstein films, they put them all on TV in the 70s as a kid and they scared the hell out of me.
It was great.
 
  • #18
anorlunda
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loved the Frankenstein films, they put them all on TV in the 70s
Especially "Young Frankenstein" right?

My favorite all time line from any movie was "Put the candle back."
 
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  • #19
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Blücher!
 
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  • #20
Klystron
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All time greatest Doc F. depiction; sorry, all the Victors in so many fine Frankenstein productions; belongs to Gene Wilder in Mel Brooks YF.
 
  • #21
pinball1970
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All time greatest Doc F. depiction; sorry, all the Victors in so many fine Frankenstein productions; belongs to Gene Wilder in Mel Brooks YF.
There was a 1973 version a year before Young Frankenstein. I remembered something about rotten flesh. It was not quite the immunology question from the OP but it made me look on line.
Turns out the 2pt series is on you tube so I watched it this morning.
brilliant. Frankenstein the true story. Not sure what the 'true' is referring to. I have not read the book.
 
  • #22
Klystron
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There was a 1973 version a year before Young Frankenstein. I remembered something about rotten flesh. It was not quite the immunology question from the OP but it made me look on line.
Turns out the 2pt series is on you tube so I watched it this morning.
brilliant. Frankenstein the true story. Not sure what the 'true' is referring to. I have not read the book.
I read Mary Godwin's novel as a child then again when 18, roughly the same age as the author. I agree with SF writer Brian Aldiss and many others that "Frankenstein, the Modern Prometheus" exemplifies the SF genre. The Gothic and fantasy elements support the speculative science and lend credence to the SF classification considering how fantasy and steampunk imbue current SF stories.

I would need to reread the novel to comment in detail but I read around 1999 that "Frankenstein" may be the novel with the most spin offs and new productions including books, movies, television shows and series, comics and graphic novels, comedies, parodies, horror shows, etc. Wikipedia mentions new interest in Mary Shelley's later novels. They may make my winter reading list if I can locate copies. I also recommend the excellent film "Gothic" that features Mary and Percy Shelley partying with Byron in Italy on the fateful night she invented Frankenstein.
 
  • #23
PeroK
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There was a 1973 version a year before Young Frankenstein. I remembered something about rotten flesh. It was not quite the immunology question from the OP but it made me look on line.
Turns out the 2pt series is on you tube so I watched it this morning.
brilliant. Frankenstein the true story. Not sure what the 'true' is referring to. I have not read the book.
I also remember that one.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070074/

What a cast!
 
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