Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen

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In summary, the team has identified a galaxy that is 13.2 billion light-years away from Earth, making it the farthest individual object ever seen.
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diogenesNY
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Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen. Pop III. Earendel. redshift 6.2
From NASA.gov

Mar 30, 2022
Record Broken: Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has established an extraordinary new benchmark: detecting the light of a star that existed within the first billion years after the universe’s birth in the big bang – the farthest individual star ever seen to date.

[...]

The newly detected star is so far away that its light has taken 12.9 billion years to reach Earth, appearing to us as it did when the universe was only 7 percent of its current age, at redshift 6.2. The smallest objects previously seen at such a great distance are clusters of stars, embedded inside early galaxies.

Full article:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2022/record-broken-hubble-spots-farthest-star-ever-seen--diogenesNY
 
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diogenesNY said:
Summary:: Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen. Pop III. Earendel. redshift 6.2

From NASA.gov

Mar 30, 2022
Record Broken: Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has established an extraordinary new benchmark: detecting the light of a star that existed within the first billion years after the universe’s birth in the big bang – the farthest individual star ever seen to date.

[...]

The newly detected star is so far away that its light has taken 12.9 billion years to reach Earth, appearing to us as it did when the universe was only 7 percent of its current age, at redshift 6.2. The smallest objects previously seen at such a great distance are clusters of stars, embedded inside early galaxies.

Full article:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2022/record-broken-hubble-spots-farthest-star-ever-seen--diogenesNY
That's amazing!

Will Webb be doubling up on some of these images? They both do IR
 
  • #3
pinball1970 said:
That's amazing!

Will Webb be doubling up on some of these images? They both do IR
Yes! That should confirm/expand current observations. Major coolness moment: Pop III, baby!

from article:
"
Astronomers expect that Earendel will remain highly magnified for years to come. It will be observed by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. Webb’s high sensitivity to infrared light is needed to learn more about Earendel, because its light is stretched (redshifted) to longer infrared wavelengths due to the universe’s expansion.

“With Webb we expect to confirm Earendel is indeed a star, as well as measure its brightness and temperature,” Coe said. These details will narrow down its type and stage in the stellar lifecycle. "We also expect to find the Sunrise Arc galaxy is lacking in heavy elements that form in subsequent generations of stars. This would suggest Earendel is a rare, massive metal-poor star,” Coe said.

[...]

“With Webb, we may see stars even farther than Earendel, which would be incredibly exciting,” Welch said. “We’ll go as far back as we can. I would love to see Webb break Earendel’s distance record.” "

--diogenesNY
 
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diogenesNY said:
Major coolness moment: Pop III, baby
How many Pop IIIs have been observed to-date?
 
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DaveC426913 said:
How many Pop IIIs have been observed to-date?
AFAIK, none have been individually identified. And this one is still speculative, but a good candidate. Still more data needed, but exciting as hell.

from article:
" If follow-up studies find that Earendel is only made up of primordial hydrogen and helium, it would be the first evidence for the legendary Population III stars, which are hypothesized to be the very first stars born after the big bang. While the probability is small, Welch admits it is enticing all the same."

--diogenesNY
 
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Here's a Dr. Becky short video on the subject:



She hints at a new video with more details on this next week.
 
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collinsmark said:
Here's a Dr. Becky short video on the subject:



She hints at a new video with more details on this next week.

I like Dr Becky.
This guy is pretty good too.

 
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Here's that more detailed Dr. Becky video:

 
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Hello all,
Along the same theme as this thread, "furthest object". I thought I'd toss this one on the pile.
"Cambridge, MA -- An international team of astronomers, including researchers at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, has spotted the most distant astronomical object ever: a galaxy."

https://cfa.harvard.edu/news/scientists-have-spotted-farthest-galaxy-ever

https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/948716

https://arxiv.org/abs/2112.09141

https://arxiv.org/abs/2201.00823v2
 

Related to Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen

What is the significance of Hubble spotting the farthest star ever seen?

The discovery of the farthest star ever seen by the Hubble Space Telescope is significant because it provides insight into the early stages of the universe. This star, named Icarus, is estimated to be 9 billion light years away, meaning that we are seeing it as it existed 9 billion years ago. This allows us to study the evolution of stars and galaxies in the early universe.

How does the Hubble telescope spot stars that are so far away?

The Hubble telescope uses a combination of powerful cameras and mirrors to capture images of distant objects in space. It is equipped with a Wide Field Camera 3, which has the ability to detect faint light from faraway objects. The telescope also uses adaptive optics to correct for distortions caused by Earth's atmosphere, allowing for clear and detailed images of distant stars and galaxies.

What is the process for confirming that the star spotted by Hubble is the farthest ever seen?

Scientists use a variety of techniques to confirm the distance of a star, including spectroscopy and parallax measurements. In the case of Icarus, its distance was confirmed through a technique called gravitational lensing, where the gravity of a massive object (in this case, a galaxy cluster) bends and magnifies the light from the distant star, allowing for a more accurate measurement of its distance.

What can we learn from studying the farthest star ever seen?

Studying the farthest star ever seen can provide valuable information about the early stages of the universe, including the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. It can also help us understand the distribution of matter in the universe and the effects of gravity on light. Additionally, studying this distant star can provide insights into the expansion of the universe and the rate at which it is accelerating.

What are the future implications of this discovery?

The discovery of the farthest star ever seen has opened up new possibilities for studying the early universe and expanding our knowledge of the cosmos. It also highlights the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope and the importance of continuing to invest in space exploration and research. This discovery may also lead to further advancements in technology and techniques for studying distant objects in space.

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