Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

If f(x,y)+f(y,x)=0 for any x,y, is it true that f(x,y)=g(x)-g(y)

  1. Apr 29, 2012 #1
    If f(x,y)+f(y,x)=0 for any x,y, is it true that f(x,y) can always be written as g(x)-g(y)?

    If so, how to prove it?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 29, 2012 #2
    No. For example yg(x)-xg(y) also satisfies the relation.
    Regards.
     
  4. Apr 29, 2012 #3
    Thanks
     
  5. Apr 30, 2012 #4
    In general f(x,y)=g(x,y)-g(y,x) obviously.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: If f(x,y)+f(y,x)=0 for any x,y, is it true that f(x,y)=g(x)-g(y)
  1. Y^2=f(x), y=f(x) (Replies: 9)

  2. Y vs f(x) (Replies: 15)

Loading...