If maths was a food, which food would it be?

  • Thread starter Antuntun
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In summary, the conversation discusses the idea of math being turned into food and what food it could be. The participants suggest various options such as pizza, pie, rice, bread, and chocolate. They also mention some unconventional choices like scalloped minced meat and a cake cut into pieces according to a mathematical sequence. Overall, the conversation highlights the creativity and diversity of opinions when it comes to connecting math and food.
  • #1
Antuntun
I think it would be a pizza because you can divide it into fractions and halfs and is interesting and different as maths is.
 
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  • #2
Antuntun said:
I think it would be a pizza because you can divide it into fractions and halfs and is interesting and different as maths is.

Pi!
 
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  • #3
But 2 PI R better!
 
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  • #4
I prefer rabbits and spirals! (Fibonacci!)
 
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  • #6
PI Z2 A
 
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  • #7
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  • #8
Butter: In a master's hands, it can produce beautiful results. Amateurs can use it enhance their own products, but doing it wrong creates a soggy mess.
 
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  • #10
Greg Bernhardt said:
Grapefruit

:confused: Did I miss something here?
 
  • #11
StatGuy2000 said:
:confused: Did I miss something here?
haha I'm not great at math so I'm bitter
 
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  • #12
Jalapeno peppers!
 
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  • #13
I don't know what it would be, but I am certain it would taste just like chicken. :wink:
 
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  • #14
Fervent Freyja said:
Jalapeno peppers!
Yes. It brings tears to the eyes of many.
 
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  • #15
Plain loaf. It is basic and essential, but made with the right technique and good ingredients, it can be absolutely amazing without the need of extra flavouring
 
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  • #16
As I'm half-Asian, my answer would be rice. It is basic and essential, and can serve as a prime ingredient for a wide range of material (food for rice, research fields for math).
 
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  • #17
StatGuy2000 said:
As I'm half-Asian, my answer would be rice. It is basic and essential, and can serve as a prime ingredient for a wide range of material (food for rice, research fields for math).
This is very interesting :woot: I am full-Asian and the first thing came to my mind was a loaf of bread. Probably more to do with having lived most of my life in New Zealand though.
Fun fact: bread is popular but disgustingly expensive in China, I guess it's a matter of projection.
 
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  • #18
Antuntun said:
I think it would be a pizza because you can divide it into fractions and halfs and is interesting and different as maths is.
256bits said:
PI Z2 A

πz2a!
 
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  • #19
Ivan Samsonov said:
πz2a!
After the math teacher told the class that the area of a circle is πr2, the Kentucky mountain man said:

"Pie are not square! Pie are round! Cornbread are square!"Ref.
 
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  • #20
Walnuts, pecans - or something hard to crack open.
 
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  • #21
OCR said:
After the math teacher told the class that the area of a circle is πr2, the Kentucky mountain man said:

"Pie are not square! Pie are round! Cornbread are square!"
320px-Vegan_Meat_Pie_01_Pengo.jpg

Image credit: Peter Halasz
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
 
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  • #22
Oh come on! If Math was food there is only one real answer: Chocolate! Nothing so bitter could taste so sweet with just a little imagination.
 
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  • #23
Scalloped minced meat. Hard to digest, but incredibly tasty :biggrin:
 
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  • #24
Metmann said:
Scalloped minced meat. Hard to digest, but incredibly tasty :biggrin:

Wow. Nice one!
 
  • #25
upload_2017-10-29_10-32-21.png
 

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  • #26
db8d33d4a3657f9bf11c02bacd0bc360--pi-pie-pi-day-pie.jpg
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  • #27
I once went to a wedding where instead of one cake, there were exactly e cakes cut into pieces so that each piece was 1, 1, 1/2, 1/6, 1/24, and so on. A cake such as this possesses infinite surface area and is therefore infinitely delicious. The bride and groom were geniuses. All anyone had to do was take an infinitesimally small slice off the end and there were still e cakes leftover at the end of the wedding.
 
  • #28
Banach-Tarski cake. You cut the cake into pieces and then reassemble the pieces to get two cakes each identical to the original.
 

Related to If maths was a food, which food would it be?

1. What do you mean by "If maths was a food"?

This is a hypothetical question that asks you to imagine if the concept of mathematics was represented by a type of food.

2. Why would someone ask this question?

This question is often asked in a playful manner to explore the idea of math being a tangible object or to spark creative thinking.

3. What are some possible answers to this question?

There is no definitive answer to this question as it is purely hypothetical. Some possible answers could be: pizza, because it is versatile and can be broken down into smaller parts (like equations); a protein bar, because it provides energy and sustenance for the brain (like math does for problem-solving); or a fruit salad, because it is a combination of different elements (like the different branches of math).

4. Does this question have any scientific significance?

No, this question is purely hypothetical and does not have any scientific significance. However, it can be a fun and creative way to think about the concept of math.

5. How does this question relate to the field of science?

This question can be used as a thought experiment to explore the relationship between abstract concepts (like math) and tangible objects (like food). It can also be a way to stimulate creative thinking and problem-solving skills, which are important in the field of science.

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