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I If pair of polynomials have Greatest Common Factor as 1 ...

  1. Jul 1, 2016 #1
    NOTE: presume real coefficients

    If a pair of polynomials have the Greatest Common Factor (GCF) as 1, it would seem that any root of one of the pair cannot possibly be a root of the other, and vice-versa, since as per the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, any polynomial can be decomposed into a set of linear (real root) or non-decomposible quadratic factor (complex conjugate root), and so if any value is a real root of one, for it to be a root of the other, the GCF would not be 1 - and likewise for any complex number, as it would only be a root for a specific quadratic factor.

    So:

    factors: A( x ) , B( x )

    A( c ) = 0 & B( c ) = 0 ⇒ GCF( A( c ) , B( c ) ) != 1

    GCF( A( c ) , B( c ) ) = 1 ⇒ !∃ c : [ A( c ) = 0 & B( c ) = 0 ] ⇔ no common roots

    !E there does not exist

    Is this accurate, or am I missing something? Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 2, 2016 #2

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    Usually we speak of a greatest common divisor. In addition I assume you meant ##GCF(A(x),B(x))## instead of ##GCF(A(c),B(c)).##
    A common zero ##c \in ℝ## of ##A## and ##B## over the reals implies a common divisor ##(x-c).##
    And isn't your second statement equivalent to your first, simply negated? Otherwise you should assume a non-trivial common divisor of ##A## and ##B## and handle the possibility that this could be a real number. And what if ##(x^2+1)## divides both?
     
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