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News Independent, the more mature choice?

  1. Jul 26, 2011 #1
    Do you think Independents are the more mature choice? I mean I don't know of an 18 year old who is independent. Or doubt there are many young people in the Independent camp.

    Further, they don't seem to be clouded by any closed ideas or principles nor too open to overwhelming change. They seem to be successful or at least well of. Can take care of themselves and want the country to be taken care of. What do you think?
     
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  3. Jul 26, 2011 #2

    Char. Limit

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    I'm a 19 year old who's Independent, if it helps.

    I chose Independent because I didn't want to be tied down to just one choice. I don't vote Democrat, I don't vote Republican. I just vote for who I think will best represent the country.

    Most of my friends on the other hand don't give a hoot about politics.
     
  4. Jul 26, 2011 #3
    You're one of a kind.
     
  5. Jul 26, 2011 #4

    Char. Limit

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    I'm not sure what you mean by that, so I choose to take it as a compliment.
     
  6. Jul 26, 2011 #5

    russ_watters

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    Laws vary by state, but functionally the only difference being registered independent provides is disqualifying you from voting in primaries.

    It certainly doesn't restrict your choices to register for a party!
     
  7. Jul 26, 2011 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    I don't think it has anything to do with maturity.

    There seem to be two distinct groups of Independents. One group runs with the tea crowd and see the Republicans as being too far to the left. Others [like me] land between the left and right and seek the middle.

    I was a Republican for about half of my adult life [actually, going back to my teens where I was politically active before I could vote]. I became so disgusted with Bush I that I became a Democrat for a short time. Soon I registered as an Independent to show my dissatisfaction with both parties. So for me it was as much a political statement as anything.

    I've been a member of the radical middle for almost twenty years now.
     
  8. Jul 26, 2011 #7
    I'm pretty sure that young people are registering as independents more than ever.
     
  9. Jul 26, 2011 #8
    Yes, that's what I meant. =]
     
  10. Jul 26, 2011 #9
    Radical middle? Says who?
     
  11. Jul 26, 2011 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    It's a tongue-in-cheek dysphemism.

    I've been accused of all sorts of crazy things here by some on the right.
     
  12. Jul 26, 2011 #11

    BobG

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    Very, very key point.

    If you live in a state with open primaries, then being an independent is a mature choice.

    If you live in a state where you have to be registered in the party to take part in its primaries, then registering independent is a noble, but naive choice. You've just chosen to eliminate your voice in selecting at least one of the candidates for the general election. You've just chosen to choose between two candidates that were selected by the most fanatical wing of their party. (Voter turnout for primaries is much, much lower than turnout for the general election and the most ardent, extreme wings of each party seem to the likeliest to vote in primaries.)
     
  13. Jul 26, 2011 #12

    turbo

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    Good point, Bob (regarding primaries).

    I have been independent for many years, but registered as a Democrat a couple of decades ago so I could participate in the Dem caucus. I was rooting for Gephardt, and felt that Jackson wouldn't stand a chance in the general election if he got the Dem nomination.
     
  14. Jul 26, 2011 #13

    Char. Limit

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    Just want to say that you don't necessarily have to vote Democrat or Republican either. I know a couple of people who vote third party. They call it a "protest vote".
     
  15. Jul 26, 2011 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    I agree with your observation but not your conclusion. I feel that my status as an Independent voter has a greater impact than my vote in the primary elections. I vote once every two years, but I'm on the books as an Independent every day.

    No doubt about it though, registering as an Independent can rob you of one of your votes. Clearly the two dominant parties want it that way, which is just another reason why I'm an Independent - I won't be bullied.

    Besides, if I think a primary election is close and I have a serious concern, I can always register by party for the primary and change back later. So far it has never been an issue. Back when we moved here I could choose to vote in either [one] primary, but not anymore.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  16. Jul 26, 2011 #15
    Most of the Independent's I know - don't want to toe a party line. As others have commented - it also allows you to choose the primary of your choice in some states (allows you to vote against someone/for a weaker candidate perhaps).
     
  17. Jul 26, 2011 #16

    SixNein

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    I think it depends upon the person. Some people are independent because they do not know what they want, and they are uninformed on current events. A great deal of political rhetoric is targeted at those people. I would guess that maybe 5% of the people who refer to themselves as independents are independents. A real independent has to have the ability to take a cool dispassionate view of the world.
     
  18. Jul 26, 2011 #17

    turbo

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    This is perhaps an uninformed view. My wife and I are independent because we don't want to be seen as "easy" votes for either party. Most of our independent friends are the same, IMO. We are not uninformed, nor are we rudderless on current affairs - we simply don't want to blindly throw our support behind either of the major political parties.

    The two-party system has become entrenched in the US, and is currently threatening to drive us into financial default due to irrational polarization. I don't want to be a follower of either major party right now, nor have I been for 30+ years.
     
  19. Jul 26, 2011 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    What an amazingly fictional load of doo doo. Most Independents I know changed their designation [dumped their party] after gaining life and political experience - in a word, "wisdom". But I too was once a young buck full of partisan ideology, so I understand your confusion.

    Beyond that, rhetoric is typically aimed at the base. Anyone with the slightest bit of political experience would know that.
     
  20. Jul 27, 2011 #19
    I think this is far from true as well.

    True independants just don't prioritize issues the same way that declared party voters do, I think that's really all there is to it. Those whom declare that they are 'independents' are either: turned off by the political title but are really aligned with one party pretty closely or truely movable in their political priorities (not neccesarilly beliefs, but priorities of those beliefs). I'd guess this is a 50/50 mix of different types of 'independents'.

    However, I feel that trying to claim superiority of any kind because (generically) you're an 'independent' (or any political party) is kinda BS. IMO this is the thinking that is steering our country off the cliff from a rhetorical perspective. In order to have proper political discourse in Washington and in circles such as this, it's important to not feel superior because of your beliefs. This type of mentality is polarizing. By thinking yourself superior or thinking the other guys 'irrelevent' - there is no wiggle room, the discourse is already over. You (as an individual claiming superiority) have already established yourself versus the other based on some non-policy attribute and are dug in, less you become embarassed for being wrong to a 'lesser' someone.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 27, 2011
  21. Jul 27, 2011 #20
    The downside of actually registering as an independent is that in most states you don't get to vote in the primary elections.
     
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