Individual Protons Are Zero Mass Particles. Is Zero Mass Defined By This?

  • Thread starter Rorkster2
  • Start date
  • #1
65
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

Individual Photons Are Zero Mass Particles. Is Zero Mass Defined By This?

Is zero mass as we know declaired because photons are theorisized to be true "weightless" and massless, or could it be a case that we do not have sensitive enough instrements and limited in our detection? Or on the other hand is their solid science backing up the theory?

Remember that E=MC^2, so that in theory in order to obtain any mass you need energy, even if it is individual 'energy bits' combined in a way beyond our understanding
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
254
0
You typed proton in the title, though I am sure you meant photon. E=mc^2 is rest mass, but because photons are never at rest, that equation does not apply.

A photon is not a defining zero mass particle, it just happens to be one which has, to our best measurement, zero mass (An upper limit is Mass m < 10^-18 eV, which is ~10^-45) - http://pdg.lbl.gov/2009/tables/rpp2009-sum-gauge-higgs-bosons.pdf
 
  • #3
65
0


Yes, Thank you. Another classic example of my mind moving faster then I can type. So as far as scientists have established, do particles have more "motion energy" then neutral or negatives 'free' elementry particles? I'm leaning towrds no but I'm not certian.
 
  • #4
254
0
You mean kinetic energy?

Actually, the rest energy is usually way higher than kinetic energy. The c^2 in mc^2 is a large number.

For SR, KE = (γ - 1)mc^2, where rest energy is mc^2. So unless gamma is equal to or greater than 2, the rest energy will be greater.
 

Related Threads for: Individual Protons Are Zero Mass Particles. Is Zero Mass Defined By This?

Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
3K
Replies
6
Views
994
Replies
7
Views
3K
Top