1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Is antimatter matter? If not, what is it?

  1. Oct 29, 2012 #1
    In other words, in terms of science, is there a category that has both antimatter and matter in it?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 29, 2012 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    "Particles"
    "Matter" (in particle physics)
     
  4. Oct 29, 2012 #3

    A.T.

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Or more specifically: "massive particles", to exclude photons, which are neither matter nor antimatter.
     
  5. Oct 29, 2012 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    What about Z bosons? They are massive particles, but do not belong to "matter" or "antimatter" as they are their own antiparticles.
    What about mesons? They are not their own antiparticles (neutral pion as exception), but there is no clear way to call some "matter" and some "antimatter".
     
  6. Oct 29, 2012 #5

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    This is a perfect example of how the term "matter" is not clearly defined.
     
  7. Oct 29, 2012 #6
    If we are using the definition of matter to be something of mass and volume, then isn't antimatter actually matter by this definition?
     
  8. Oct 29, 2012 #7

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I would say that you could use the term matter to refer to fundamental and composite particles that bind together to form structures of finite volume and mass. In such a case, yes, antimatter would fit this definition.
     
  9. Oct 29, 2012 #8

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    It's important not to get the idea that 'antimatter' has negative mass. It just has other aspects to it which are the opposite 'sign' to 'normal matter'. The two forms of matter will still anihilate each other when they get close enough and produce a lot of energy (EM).
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Is antimatter matter? If not, what is it?
  1. Matter and antimatter (Replies: 6)

  2. Does antiMatter matter (Replies: 5)

Loading...