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Is freezing point always depressed by a solute?

  1. Oct 26, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Is the freezing point always depressed by a solute even if solute-solvent interactions are stronger than solute-solute and solvent-solvent interaction? What about amorphous solids?

    2. Relevant knowledge
    According to my chemistry teacher's powerpoints, the freezing point is always depressed by the presence of a solute because the solute particles disrupt the lattice structure of the solid.

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Thus, the solution remains liquid at lower than normal temperatures due to the added difficulty of forming the solid structure. The stronger solute-solvent interactions add to this disorder.

    In amorphous solids where there is little/no organized set structure to speak of, I don't know how solute particles would interfere unless the solute forms its own competing structure as a solid. Otherwise, I'm in the dark.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 27, 2015 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Amorphous solids don't have a freezing point.
     
  4. Oct 29, 2015 #3
    Do amorphous solids not have changes of state?
     
  5. Oct 29, 2015 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Not at a constant temperature. Google vitrification.
     
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