Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Is this Saturn photo real or an artist's rendition?

  1. Jan 24, 2017 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 24, 2017 #2
    My guess is that probably there is some sort of digital post processing of the photo but I might be wrong and it could be the raw image, I don't have big experience on astronomical photos.
     
  4. Jan 24, 2017 #3

    Al_

    User Avatar

    Looks genuine to me!
    It looks like it was taken from a space probe, not an Earth telescope.
    It has well defined stripes and if you zoom in it's grainy, as you would expect.
     
  5. Jan 24, 2017 #4
    From your own link:
    "The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2016."
     
  6. Jan 24, 2017 #5

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    as the last two posters said .... it's real

    it does say that :wink:
     
  7. Jan 24, 2017 #6
    Yea it just looks so unreal
     
  8. Jan 25, 2017 #7

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    the universe is an amazing place with many wonders to behold :smile:
     
  9. Feb 1, 2017 #8

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I believe it's pretty common to add 'sharpening' to such pictures. That could account for the apparent extra resolution. Excessive sharpening of very common on the images (ordinary photos) in newspapers and magazines, to make up for the limited resolution of cheaper printing. It's something that can be done on pictures before they are reduced to JPEG, which can give some horrible effects.
     
  10. Feb 3, 2017 #9

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That's definitely not a raw image. It's almost certainly had various image processing techniques (like dark frame subtraction) applied and the contrast and brightness has been changed to make all the details visible. It may have even been made by a composition of multiple images. Space telescopes and probes operate in very adverse conditions, with cosmic rays and other particles frequently impacting the sensor. Using multiple images allows you to filter out the noise generated by these events without losing the details of the object.
     
  11. Feb 4, 2017 #10

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Yes but you could regard it as a way of presenting relevant information whilst reducing spurious effects. The same could be said of more or less any astronomical picture that's published. The blurred thing they started off with wouldn't appeal to anyone. Perhaps a health warning should be required for such images. They can be a source of deep disappointment for newbie astronomers who think that the pictures on the adverts for the scope they just bought were what they could expect to see with it.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Is this Saturn photo real or an artist's rendition?
  1. Amazing saturn photo (Replies: 3)

  2. Saturns rings (Replies: 2)

  3. Finding saturn (Replies: 5)

Loading...