Job Options with Physics Degree: Discerning Majors

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  • Thread starter E36_Sean_GC8
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In summary: Generally speaking, a BS in physics will give you a good foundation for a career in engineering, though the two fields may be quite different. Some engineering programs may have an option to do a dual degree where you finish your undergraduate degree in physics and then continue your studies in engineering.
  • #1
E36_Sean_GC8
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Hey guys, first post on here! I've done a bit of reading and searching but wanted to ask specific questions.

I've got an odd idea on what I will be doing but am willing to work towards what I want.

I restarted school after a 6 year hiatus last year. Initially, I wanted to get an exercise science degree so that I could get to Physical Therapy school. Once realizing what actually happens if I don't make it to PT school (no, I really don't want to be a personal trainer), I searched for what I enjoy doing and how a major could relate to that best. Cars, racing, space, physics. These all excite me greater than anything other than the human body and basketball.

My idea: Take pre-reqs for PT school (3 bio classes, 3 chem classes and basic maths) then move on to a Physics degree in case I don't make it to grad school (I will though!).

My main questions:
Can I get a BS in physics and work with engineering? I'm thinking medical equipment and/or automotive industry.

Does a BA in physics work any differently?
I suppose I should include my pre-reqs if it helps any.

Biology 160
Biology 241, 242 (Anatomy and Physiology)
Math 141 (pre-calc 1) (142 summer term)
Chemistry 121
English 101

I want to attend Eastern Washington U, but am open to any other options as I don't really mind where I go but really want to finish my education.

I appreciate any and all responses, even the criticism!
 
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  • #2
E36_Sean_GC8 said:
Can I get a BS in physics and work with engineering? I'm thinking medical equipment and/or automotive industry.

You *can* work in engineering with a physics degree, but it can be very difficult, particularly in a slower economy. If you really want to have engineering as a backup career, your best bet would be to enroll in an engineering program. Generally speaking, physics graduate school should be a serious possibility for you if you enroll as a physics undergraduate. Or maybe a desire to be a teacher. But physiotherapy as a primary with engineering as a backup - you're likely better off to study engineering.

Does a BA in physics work any differently?
You mean compared to a BSc? It depends on the school.
 
  • #3
Choppy said:
You *can* work in engineering with a physics degree, but it can be very difficult, particularly in a slower economy. If you really want to have engineering as a backup career, your best bet would be to enroll in an engineering program. Generally speaking, physics graduate school should be a serious possibility for you if you enroll as a physics undergraduate. Or maybe a desire to be a teacher. But physiotherapy as a primary with engineering as a backup - you're likely better off to study engineering.You mean compared to a BSc? It depends on the school.

Awesome, thanks a ton for your input! It's hard to get a hold of an adviser at all.

I'm looking particularly at Eastern Wa U, that's why I asked about BS in physics.

http://www.ewu.edu/cstem/programs/physics
 

Related to Job Options with Physics Degree: Discerning Majors

What career options are available with a degree in Physics?

With a degree in Physics, you can pursue a variety of career paths in fields such as research and development, engineering, data analysis, finance, education, and more.

What skills do I need to have for a job in Physics?

Some essential skills for a career in Physics include problem-solving, critical thinking, mathematical proficiency, programming, and analytical skills. Additionally, strong communication and collaboration skills are necessary for working in teams and presenting findings.

What are some entry-level jobs for Physics majors?

Some entry-level jobs for Physics majors include research assistant, laboratory technician, data analyst, quality control specialist, and engineering technician. These roles provide hands-on experience and opportunities for career advancement.

What industries hire Physics majors?

Physics majors can find job opportunities in a wide range of industries, including aerospace, defense, energy, healthcare, information technology, and finance. Many organizations value the problem-solving and analytical skills that Physics majors possess.

How do I decide on a specialization within Physics?

Choosing a specialization within Physics depends on your interests and career goals. Some popular specializations include astrophysics, quantum mechanics, biophysics, and materials science. It is recommended to explore various options through coursework, research, and internships before making a decision.

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