Let's stop helping poor people, veterans, and farmers

  • News
  • Thread starter chroot
  • Start date
  • #26
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,323
3
Enjoy Canada while it lasts because it won't be like this forever. This country is already falling apart with the majority of Canadians agreeing with private health care.

We are the first G-8 country to start paying down their debt (according to the news), and people seem to think its a good idea to spend all that money we just payed down.

Quite personally, I love Canada (my country) and hockey, but I don't think I will live here forever.

Note: Quebec is most certainly separating from Canada, and that is a really good option for me. They love free health care, they embrace a relaxed lifestyle, and they have the best hockey players.
 
  • #27
151
0
Kerrie said:
You would be amazed at how much some people get a month for food stamps, and what they end up spending their food stamps on. I have known people who legitamately needed the help, and then I have known people who think getting their food stamps are a way of life indefinitely.

This is getting a little better at least. The new credit-card things they're using (instead of paper food-stamps) makes it a lot harder to defraud the system. No selling food-stamps for 25 cents on the dollar or buying a stick of bubble gum with a food-stamp dollar and then using the 3 quarters in change to buy a 40. I think this is the crux of the problem though. I wouldn't mind contributing a portion of my salary every month to help those who are truly in need. Unfortunately, for every person in need, there are probably 2 that just want to take advantage of the system. :grumpy:

As for the VA benefits, I don't imagine it would make much of a difference. Most people who can afford a type of healthcare other than the VA system will do so anyway. There are just too many problems with the VA healthcare system to make most people voluntarily seek it.
 
  • #28
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
GENIERE said:
Moonbear- I’m almost in total agreement with your statements. I’m particularly concerned with the mental health of the vets. I would think (guess) proper treatment of battlefield psychosis is only available via a small number of physicians.

This may have been the case years ago, but I think post-traumatic stress disorder is quite well recognized now and there are others aside from vets who suffer from this. However, even if there are only a few psychiatrists specializing in these particular disorders, relocating them down the street to another medical center/hospital would be the easiest of changes since psychiatry really doesn't require specialized equipment.

Many injuries are life long afflictions requiring oft-repeated visits to the VA centers. The shared camaraderie with other vets during these visits I think is a very important part of their mental well-being. Years ago, on some trips to the VA, I noted that the Vets roam around, inside, outside, play cards, take a sip out of a brown bag, grab a smoke (odd smelling smoke) while carrying an O2 bottle; they’re everywhere but in their room. I think many are there just because they know a buddy is there, someone they met there.

This is something I would question. I'm sure that you're right, this is a reason vets congregate there, to socialize, but is this something that is actually helpful for them? I think there was a time, especially with the Vietnam Vets, when they did need some comraderie of fellow vets because they were facing such blatant discrimination from civilians who blamed them for the war. However, clinging together like that only encourages living in the past and provides an excuse for not assimilating back into society, thus keeping themselves as outcasts. Surely they could join their local VFW for the same comraderie if that's important. I lean toward thinking their mental recovery may be better if the person they were running into during repeated hospital visits for therapy wasn't a vet, so they would talk about other things in life aside from war. I wonder if anyone has really looked into that with respect to recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Does it help to be around others who had a similar experience, or is it better to not be around people continually reminding you of that experience?

On a similar vein, it also seems it would be a burden on the vets and/or their families to have to continue to visit a VA facility that may not be very close to home when they need long-term outpatient care if they could get the same care closer to home.

About the only issue I can see arising would be a possible necessity for some physicians to have security clearance to treat certain patients (for example, a psychiatrist or anesthesiologist treating someone who was privy to top secret information), but it seems this could be accomplished with a handful of facilities, or simply ensuring other hospitals in a few locations hire such staff.
 
  • #29
GENIERE
Moonbear-I'm for it. As soon as I finish this response, I'm E-mailing Don Rumsfeld, join me.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #30
russ_watters
Mentor
20,874
7,399
Greg Bernhardt said:
woohoo I'm an idiot :rolleyes:
Nice to have you on the team, Greg.
 
  • #32
22
0
JasonRox said:
majority of Canadians agreeing with private health care

Sorry to runoff topic here but...are you sure this is true JasonRox. From my experience and opinion gathering it seems to be the opposite, with the exception of Alberta.
 
Last edited:
  • #33
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
GENIERE said:
Moonbear-I'm for it. As soon as I finish this response, I'm E-mailing Don Rumsfeld, join me.

LOL! Seriously, I've only been pulling that stuff off the top of my head. There must be things I've overlooked that would complicate the issue (one major one would be getting university administrators to go along with the plan, but as long as it's a public institution and Federal funding is used as the bargaining chip, I think they could be persuaded). Is there some reason this wouldn't work, some hidden cost I haven't considered, etc?
 
  • #34
GENIERE
Moonbear said:
LOL! Seriously, I've only been pulling that stuff off the top of my head. There must be things I've overlooked that would complicate the issue (one major one would be getting university administrators to go along with the plan, but as long as it's a public institution and Federal funding is used as the bargaining chip, I think they could be persuaded). Is there some reason this wouldn't work, some hidden cost I haven't considered, etc?


I did E-mail Rumsfeld. Public or private who cares? Since I'm a tech type guy, I never got past middle management in the three hospitals I worked for and was never interested in the finance side. I'm sure the bueaucrats can (falsely) find many reasons for it not working.
 
  • #35
731
6
Ivan Seeking said:
:bugeye: :bugeye: :bugeye: YOU??? :surprised :surprised :surprised

You could knock me over with a feather. I thought you were a liberal!!!
How could you? :cry:
power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Greg was a card carrying liberal. Then he started PF, started raking in the dough. Started looking at tax breaks for the wealthy. all you people who registered and paid your nominal fee are too blame.
 
  • #36
SOS2008
Gold Member
31
1
chroot said:
...Bush is almost assuredly going to be remembered as one of history's worst presidents.

Bush's entire goal was: 1) to avenge his father, which he as done, 2) serve a second term--unlike his father, which he as done, and 3) become a legacy in the history books as the best President our country has ever had, what ever it takes, at any cost. This is the method to the madness, and it's two out of three so far. Bush supporters will tell you he will achieve #3.

Most of these supporters have no idea about the topics discussed in this forum, let alone watch the news--be it as crappy as it is. How do you change the thinking of people like that? The only solace is that these people probably don't write history books.

As for subsidizing farmers, global warming is a larger concern if you ask me. Aside from believing that Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs should come first and be available to all, even if it means protectionism or subsidy, I hope farmers will diversify in anticipation of climate changes, and perhaps we should stock pile whatever we can.

In the meantime I agree we should support our troops and stop the lies.
 

Related Threads on Let's stop helping poor people, veterans, and farmers

Replies
5
Views
3K
M
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
26
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
3K
Replies
24
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
19
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
Top