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Liquid ocean in Uranus and Neptune

  1. Jun 7, 2009 #1
    Are there oceans of liquid water in Uranus and Neptune? I remember once reading that there were.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 7, 2009 #2
    There is no liquid water in Uranus because uranus is a gas planet but im not sure about Neptune
     
  4. Jun 7, 2009 #3
    Pleas let me correct myself there is a large quantity of water in both Neptune and Uranus but u cn only find them at their cores.
    As both planets are far away from the sun the waters are frozen and mixed with loads of different gases.
     
  5. Jun 7, 2009 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    There are certainly no oceans of liquid water on either planet, at least not oceans in the conventional sense. The mantle of those planets probably contains some H2O, but in a kind of slurry - it would be under extreme temperatures and pressures.
     
  6. Jun 7, 2009 #5
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uranus

    The ice mantle is not in fact composed of ice in the conventional sense, but of a hot and dense fluid consisting of water, ammonia and other volatiles.[8][55] This fluid, which has a high electrical conductivity, is sometimes called a water–ammonia ocean
     
  7. Jun 8, 2009 #6
    so both planets are gas planets?
     
  8. Jun 8, 2009 #7
    This fluid, which has a high electrical conductivity, is sometimes called a water–ammonia ocean.[56] The bulk compositions of Uranus and Neptune are very different from those of Jupiter and Saturn, with ice dominating over gases, hence justifying their separate classification as ice giants.

    The total mass of ice in Uranus's interior is not precisely known, as different figures emerge depending on the model chosen; however, it must be between 9.3 and 13.5 Earth masses.[8][54] Hydrogen and helium constitute only a small part of the total, with between 0.5 and 1.5 Earth masses.[8] The remainder of the mass (0.5 to 3.7 Earth masses) is accounted for by rocky material.[8]
     
  9. Jun 8, 2009 #8

    Vanadium 50

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    Granpa, if you are going to plagiarize Wikipedia, it looks better if you remove the pointers to the now non-existent references.
     
  10. Jun 8, 2009 #9
    if I were plagerizing it dont you think that I woud have removed them. nor would I have given the link to the article itself in post 5
     
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