Looking for the physical properties of the skin

  • Thread starter fargoth
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  • #1
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ive been searching through many biophysics and physiology books lately... but i haven't found anything useful... i want to find some explanations of the structure of the skin - but not the ones you'd get from biology books - i want equations that describe the impedance of each layer of the skin, heat conduction, dielectric coefficient, magnetic permeability.. these sort of things.

anyone knows where i could learn about it?
 
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  • #2
Danger
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No real clue. All that I can think of right now is that perhaps researchers working on prosthetics or biomechanics related to sports performance might have that sort of stuff in their files. They tend to be pretty thorough about data collection.
 
  • #3
brewnog
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You won't find a lot of data, since there's such variability in nature, and no manufacturing process control of which to speak. Also, the properties vary vastly depending on the body part; compare the skin on the heel of your foot to that on your eyelid.

If you do manage to find anything, please post back and let me know.
 
  • #4
arildno
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I'm sure Mengele tried to determine these properties with some real-life experiments..:yuck:
 
  • #5
brewnog
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arildno said:
I'm sure Mengele tried to determine these properties with some real-life experiments..:yuck:
I'm not sure his work was published...!
 
  • #6
radou
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fargoth said:
ive been searching through many biophysics and physiology books lately... but i haven't found anything useful... i want to find some explanations of the structure of the skin - but not the ones you'd get from biology books - i want equations that describe the impedance of each layer of the skin, heat conduction, dielectric coefficient, magnetic permeability.. these sort of things.

anyone knows where i could learn about it?
You should get into elasticity theory. :biggrin:
 
  • #7
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Probably the easiest approximation that you can use it to treat it as water.
 
  • #8
radou
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Manchot said:
Probably the easiest approximation that you can use it to treat it as water.
Umm, so I guess that makes [tex]\frac{p}{\rho g} + \frac{v^2}{2g}+z [/tex] constant along the same wrinkle? :biggrin:
 
  • #9
arildno
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Only if you are in a STATIONARY sweaty state, which seems somewhat difficult to achieve, but I am digressing..shut up myself.
 
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  • #10
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Danger said:
All that I can think of right now is that perhaps researchers working on prosthetics or biomechanics related to sports performance might have that sort of stuff in their files. They tend to be pretty thorough about data collection.
yes, i thought about finding one, but i wanted to do some basic research of my own before i talk to an expert in the field... when you know almost nothing you don't have the right questions.
 
  • #11
Danger
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I suspect, though, that this might be an area where there's no 'in-between'. Anybody who knows anything about it probably is an expert.
 

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