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Magnetic implant creates 6th sense

  1. Jun 23, 2006 #1

    matthyaouw

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    Magnetic implant creates "6th sense"

    Article.

    I personally think this is fascinating, and would like to see it developed further. Any thoughts?
     
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  3. Jun 23, 2006 #2

    Ouabache

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    If you had one of those implants, you probably would not want an MRI taken on that part of your body. If you did have an MRI, the implant would torque (twist) strongly inside you.
     
  4. Jun 24, 2006 #3

    Moonbear

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    I was hoping one of the physicists would chime in as to whether a magnet would vibrate as described under those conditions. If it does vibrate, then it's plausible that the mechanoreceptors in your fingers could detect the motion. At least, it would work until your body encapsulated the magnet in connective tissue to try to sequester the foreign object. I don't know if it would be enough to really perceive the change or not. Without knowing if the vibration would really happen, I'm not sure if this is a real sensation or a tingling due to damaged nerves in the fingertip caused by the implant and having nothing to do with EM fields.

    I'm still not sure WHY you'd want to do that to yourself. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Jun 24, 2006 #4
    Why make it an implant? Isnt the only reason that it conveys its information to the body? There are so many better ways to recieve information, like mmm a picture or a sound... Id prefer a haptic-like device myself.

    EDIT: The market for the sex toy industry must be astronomical.... :rofl:
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2006
  6. Jun 25, 2006 #5

    Ouabache

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    As long as current is flowing in the wires, it will vibrate. To get an idea of what happens; when there is an AC (alternating current) electrical signal present, a corresponding magnetic force associated with the signal, will oscillate along with it. This will induce a torque (motion) in a fixed (in this case; implanted) magnet which will oscillate (move forward and backward) with the periodicity of the signal. (For a 60Hz signal its period is 1/f = 16.7msec.). Try holding a floating compass near a wire carrying current and watch what happens to the compass.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2006
  7. Jun 25, 2006 #6

    NoTime

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    When I was playing with magnetic sensors it was easy to detect current in say a lamp power cord. So I don't see any reason to complain about a small magnet vibrating next to one. The sensitivity of a finger is pretty high, so I wouldn't just rule it out.

    OTOH there is always the "golden ear" effect, where someone that claims to be able to detect something just can't do it in a double blind test.
    The variability of the reported results makes this a possibility. Variations in physiology could also come into play.
    Don't know if the encapsulation effect would make a difference since the capsule would vibrate with the magnet.

    I would think it would work just as well if you just glued the magnet to your finger. So maybe someone with some spare time, a suitable magnet and some glue could try it out. :smile:

    Makes at least as much sense as body piercing. :yuck:
     
  8. Jun 25, 2006 #7
    *Runs off and briskly rubs his nipple piercings up against his guitar amp magnet*
     
  9. Jun 25, 2006 #8

    NoTime

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    :rofl: and the result of your experiment?
     
  10. Jun 25, 2006 #9

    Gokul43201

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    Yes, it would (try to oscillate when brought near any AC current). The strength of the forces and torques however, is what is important. And I have no idea what the sensitivity of a mechanoreceptor is like.

    Would the sensitivity be much greater than if I just stuck a piece of the same magnet (over the skin) on my fingertip? How much does it help to be embedded? Does the implant make "direct contact" with the receptor? These must sound like completely idiotic questions, but I have no idea of the spatial geometry of these things.

    Even then, the torque will be transfered to this connective tissue. But if there's a lot of lossy tissue that gets between the implant and the receptor, the signal strength (or sensation) will diminish.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2006
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