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News Malala Yousafzai

  1. Oct 9, 2012 #1
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-19882799

    This girl at the age of 11 was posting anti-Taliban opinions for BBC Urdu service under a pen name and then her name was exposed later when Taliban was driven out of SWAT.

    I have been really amazed to see how an 11 years old can take so risky but right actions what even the strong political leaders in Pakistan can't do. So, I was bit displeased how her parents are threw her in danger. But at same time, I think we do need people like her to bring positive changes in the world, and this is the reason I wanted to dedicate a thread to her.

    Hopefully, she lives on and continues the endeavors of bringing equality for women in those regions.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 9, 2012 #2

    lisab

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    I read this story today and it really bothered me. I imagine many Pakistanis are horrified by it.
     
  4. Oct 9, 2012 #3

    SixNein

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    I don't know. That area of the world never ceases to amaze me.
     
  5. Oct 9, 2012 #4
    I still cannot comprehend how an 11 years old can understand and challenge the ill-social-norms.

    Here's her diary, translated to English:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7834402.stm

    It doesn't sound like the diary of an 11 years old. Maybe children there grow much ahead of their ages
     
  6. Oct 9, 2012 #5

    lisab

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    It's unusual, but not unheard of. Gifted children are often verbal well beyond their years.
     
  7. Oct 9, 2012 #6
  8. Oct 9, 2012 #7
    Do you think she would have managed to publish her diaries to BBC herself? Could it be her idea to tell the world what is going on? Her parents should have thought of her safety, atleast should not have exposed her real name.
     
  9. Oct 10, 2012 #8

    Astronuc

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  10. Oct 10, 2012 #9

    Bobbywhy

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    Malala Yousafzai was airlifted by a government helicopter to Peshawar where doctors removed the bullet from her head. Doctors say she is in "guarded" condition. I gather from this she will survive.

    When others have survived assassination attempts in this part of the world folks start to think that God has intervened to save them. This phenomenon gives the victim great credence and increases their influence.

    So, in my opinion, some good can come from the barbaric and vicious attack on this fourteen-year-old girl who has spoken out against terrorism and in favor of education for girls. Most Pakistanis are horrified by the sensless attack, from the news reports filtering out. I sincerely hope she recovers completely and continues her activism, with her power to persuade boosted by this incident. Societies in chaos and confusion can learn much from Malala Yousafzai.
     
  11. Oct 10, 2012 #10

    cobalt124

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    Very brave girl. From what I read on the BBC website, her parents did not give her protection as they thought the Taliban would not shoot a young girl. Not only did they do it, they claimed responsibility for it. So you can make what you will of the parental responsibility part of this. I shudder to think how whoever carried out the shootings views young girls.
     
  12. Oct 10, 2012 #11

    jtbell

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    And they've said they'll go after her again.
     
  13. Oct 10, 2012 #12

    OmCheeto

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    11 year olds can understand a lot.
     
  14. Oct 11, 2012 #13
    More likely explained by the translator taking liberties. I don't speak Hindi/Urdu, and most likely no one else here does either (unless some of the Academic Guidance folks have stuck around), so we can't know how it sounds in the native language.
     
  15. Oct 26, 2012 #14

    Q_Goest

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    Some terrific news, Malala is recovering well:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/26/ziauddin-yousufzai_n_2022454.html?utm_hp_ref=world [Broken]

    More good news:
    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-N...rest-9-in-Malala-shooting/UPI-55131351144473/

    If you see this man, either call the cops or use him for a speed bump.
    http://media.skynews.com/media/images/generated/2012/10/25/199991/default/v1/glass-hd-background-mstr-st-1-522x293.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  16. Oct 26, 2012 #15
    Except, speed up instead of slowing down :D
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2017
  17. Oct 26, 2012 #16
    It's unfortunate how intelligent people, with good education backgrounds, fall into the darkness.
     
  18. Oct 26, 2012 #17

    drizzle

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    I'm not sure what they're reading or how they comprehend. This is sick. :mad:
     
  19. Oct 26, 2012 #18
    Intelligence and education don't change who you are inside.
     
  20. Oct 26, 2012 #19

    mheslep

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    Aye.

    Goebbels: PhD drama
    Mohamed Atta: studied architecture in Cairo and Hamburg.
    Ayman al-Zawahiri (head of AQ): physician, surgeon from Cairo U.
    Ted Kaczynski (unabomber): matriculate Harvard 16, PhD mathematics Michigan.
    Pol Pot: studied electronics in Paris

    and more generally
    2ntd2x4.png
     
  21. Oct 29, 2012 #20
    The outside environment where you are brought up determines your character.. If the terrorist had been adopted as a baby and brought up in a typical American family, I am sure he would have grown up as the rest of their countrymen. There's no "inside" to anyone.
     
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