More articles like Feynman's Value of Science (1955)?

In summary, according to this article, scientists should continue to pursue knowledge for the sake of knowledge, even if the general public does not understand or appreciate it. Poincare believes that Truth is the only thing that is beautiful, and so the arduous search for it is worthwhile. He also thinks that ethics and natural philosophy are two different things with no overlap, and they are both a search for truth.
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crashcat
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I just read Feynman's The Value of Science and really appreciated his perspective. We generally value art, literature, and poetry but if you want to do science for the sake of science people take offense. It takes years to build a foundation before you can appreciate it, so the general public will never understand that it is beautiful and worth doing because of the grand feelings available to you which I think exceeds any other art, and because it is enjoyable for it's own sake. Ditto mathematics.

SO... anyone have more articles or books like this? On a sort of philosophy of science (that isn't what historians or philosophers mean when they write about the philosophy of science)? It can be broader than simply explaining an appreciation about science. I just want scientists writing about science.
 
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I'm told that many pro athletes feel the same way.
 
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crashcat said:
I just read Feynman's The Value of Science and really appreciated his perspective. We generally value art, literature, and poetry but if you want to do science for the sake of science people take offense. It takes years to build a foundation before you can appreciate it, so the general public will never understand that it is beautiful and worth doing because of the grand feelings available to you which I think exceeds any other art, and because it is enjoyable for it's own sake.
I hadn't seen this, thanks for posting the link.

I absolutely love this early paragraph:
"I believe that a scientist looking at non-scientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy - and when he talks about a non-scientific matter, he will sound as naive as anyone untrained in the matter. Since the question of the value of science is not a scientific subject, this talk is dedicated to proving my point - by example." - R. P. Feynman

I think he may have succeeded in this talk.
 
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Hornbein said:
I'm told that many pro athletes feel the same way.
I can believe it. Maybe this is true of any high-skill deep thing.
 
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I found an article written by Poincaré in sometime before 1912, literally also called The Value of Science. The first paragraph mirrors Feynman, but then it diverges considerably. He describes how Truth is the only thing that is beautiful, and so the arduous search for it is worthwhile. Also, stuff like how the material world cannot be taken to be real, the only objective reality is the models of the material world shared by intelligent beings. He says that ethics and natural philosophy are two different things with no overlap, and they are both a search for truth. I was thinking this sounds Hermetic/Masonic… and I found a website claiming he was a Freemason. So maybe.

Poincare Value of Science
(scroll past the translator's introduction)
 

Related to More articles like Feynman's Value of Science (1955)?

1. What is the main message of Feynman's "Value of Science" article?

The main message of Feynman's article is that science is not just about discovering facts, but also about the process of questioning and testing ideas. He emphasizes the importance of skepticism and critical thinking in the pursuit of knowledge.

2. How does Feynman define the value of science?

Feynman defines the value of science as the understanding of the world around us and our place in it. He believes that the pursuit of knowledge through science is a fundamental human desire and is essential for the progress of society.

3. What are some examples of the "pleasure" that Feynman describes in relation to science?

Feynman describes the pleasure of discovering something new and unexpected, the satisfaction of solving a challenging problem, and the joy of sharing knowledge with others. He also mentions the pleasure of being able to appreciate the beauty and complexity of the natural world through a scientific lens.

4. How does Feynman address the potential negative impacts of science?

Feynman acknowledges that science can be misused or lead to unintended consequences, but he believes that the benefits of scientific progress outweigh the risks. He also emphasizes the importance of ethical responsibility and the need for scientists to consider the potential consequences of their work.

5. What is the significance of Feynman's statement, "Nature cannot be fooled"?

Feynman's statement highlights the idea that the laws of nature cannot be altered or manipulated, no matter how much we may want to believe otherwise. He emphasizes the importance of basing scientific conclusions on evidence and not allowing personal biases or desires to influence our understanding of the natural world.

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