Need to revise, nothing entering my brain after studying for few hrs

In summary, As an expert in artificial intelligence, Shivajikobardan recommends that you try harder than just watching videos and reading blog posts in order to remember the concepts for an exam. He also recommends practicing yoga and meditation to help improve your ability to remember information.
  • #1
shivajikobardan
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I am studying artificial intelligence for exam and came to a point where I need to revise everything I stuided. It ofc takes more effort in brain than learning the concept watching tutorials and reading blog posts as you need to memorize it(for exam).

Any guidance, on how to crack this position and start revising in such a way everything enters my head? Will yoga and meditation help? How do you guys do yoga and mditation at night? My room is filled with dirt so It is not possible to do yoga here. I feel lazy to do yoga in morning outside. Should I go outside(top of my house) to do yoga and meditation? Will that help? Please guide? Sorry for off topic. Really bothering me.
 
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  • #2
Hi, @shivajikobardan, how many hours do you sleep? It's very important. Is the way the brain works. That is what I was told: to face the grade in Physics, the first commitment was to dedicate a lot of hours to sleep. Yoga is also very good idea.
Love
 
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  • #3
shivajikobardan said:
My room is filled with dirt so It is not possible to do yoga here. I feel lazy to do yoga in morning outside. Should I go outside(top of my house) to do yoga and meditation? Will that help? Please guide? Sorry for off topic. Really bothering me.
I routinely practice yoga stretching (Hatha) and strength (Lyengar) exercises to align, balance and strengthen my body and retain ability to walk. At home in the morning I perform 'floor exercises' using the same firm bed that I use for sleep.

Smooth the sheets and blankets and remove large pillows, keeping a thin pillow to support your neck. Spread large towel or foam mat as needed. In cold weather I add a heating pad under shoulders and spine.

Gently perform your supine stretches including breathing, abdomen, 'bridges', etc., using a canvas belt, band or towel as needed to stretch your lower body. Rotate one quarter turn for left/right leg lifts. Rotate one half turn from supine to prone position for 'cobra' and 'airplane' exercises. Push up from prone position into kneeling 'table' pose then to opposite leg/arm lifts, if able. Fold face down into 'child' pose to rest.

Stay loose and relaxed throughout the smooth motion. Never jerk, strain or cause pain. Breathe fully and easily. Do not hold your breath. Breath in on the rest phase, out on movement. Never hold your breath. Relax. Focus. Stay centered.

Transit to standing and sitting exercises beside your bed or outdoors in a larger space, using mats as required for comfort. At this point I mix other disciplines with yoga including elements of tai chi, wing chun, elastic bands and practicing with the sticks and canes I require for stability.

Breathe deeply. Remain loose and relaxed. After aerobic exercises such as walking, cycling and swimming, lie supine to rest and complete stretches as needed. Make your exercise routine your own. Vary exercises and emphasize different body elements on different days. Keep goals simple and attainable without pain.
"Mind in the Body".
 
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  • #4
I suggest that you try reading and modifying and testing, and experimenting with, some open source AI code that is closely related to your areas of study.
 
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  • #5
And, as @Vanadium 50 at least once said (perhaps more concisely/pithily) here on PF, solving problems yourself will teach you how to solve problems far better than watching videos of other people solving problems will.
 
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  • #6
mcastillo356 said:
Hi, @shivajikobardan, how many hours do you sleep? It's very important. Is the way the brain works. That is what I was told: to face the grade in Physics, the first commitment was to dedicate a lot of hours to sleep. Yoga is also very good idea.
Love
i sleep a lot bro. turns out after i sleep and wake up i was all good to learn. i am enjoying it..but how do i maximize my study hours. i can't study beyond 6-7 hrs per day.
 
  • #7
sysprog said:
And, as @Vanadium 50 at least once said (perhaps more concisely/pithily) here on PF, solving problems yourself will teach you how to solve problems far better than watching videos of other people solving problems will.
very helpful bro. i went on a whiteboard, and surprised things started entering my brain easily.
 
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  • #8
Klystron said:
I routinely practice yoga stretching (Hatha) and strength (Lyengar) exercises to align, balance and strengthen my body and retain ability to walk. At home in the morning I perform 'floor exercises' using the same firm bed that I use for sleep.

Smooth the sheets and blankets and remove large pillows, keeping a thin pillow to support your neck. Spread large towel or foam mat as needed. In cold weather I add a heating pad under shoulders and spine.

Gently perform your supine stretches including breathing, abdomen, 'bridges', etc., using a canvas belt, band or towel as needed to stretch your lower body. Rotate one quarter turn for left/right leg lifts. Rotate one half turn from supine to prone position for 'cobra' and 'airplane' exercises. Push up from prone position into kneeling 'table' pose then to opposite leg/arm lifts, if able. Fold face down into 'child' pose to rest.

Stay loose and relaxed throughout the smooth motion. Never jerk, strain or cause pain. Breathe fully and easily. Do not hold your breath. Breath in on the rest phase, out on movement. Never hold your breath. Relax. Focus. Stay centered.

Transit to standing and sitting exercises beside your bed or outdoors in a larger space, using mats as required for comfort. At this point I mix other disciplines with yoga including elements of tai chi, wing chun, elastic bands and practicing with the sticks and canes I require for stability.

Breathe deeply. Remain loose and relaxed. After aerobic exercises such as walking, cycling and swimming, lie supine to rest and complete stretches as needed. Make your exercise routine your own. Vary exercises and emphasize different body elements on different days. Keep goals simple and attainable without pain.
"Mind in the Body".
thanks bro.
 
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  • #9
Yoga? :oldbiggrin:
No! it's Yoda!
 
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  • #10
shivajikobardan said:
i sleep a lot bro. turns out after i sleep and wake up i was all good to learn. i am enjoying it..but how do i maximize my study hours. i can't study beyond 6-7 hrs per day.
One key to effective studying is to use "retrieval practice" as much as possible. That means pulling things out of your brain, not merely rereading the text or watching others solve problems. This matches the advice from @Vanadium 50, as mentioned here:
sysprog said:
And, as @Vanadium 50 at least once said (perhaps more concisely/pithily) here on PF, solving problems yourself will teach you how to solve problems far better than watching videos of other people solving problems will.
The more you solve problems on your own, the more you'll really learn.

A lot of work has been done over the last few decades on effective study techniques. Many students use methods of study that seem natural and to make sense, but they are ineffective. For example, it's tempting to simply reread a textbook to review a topic, but that's not the best way to study. There's something called the "fluency illusion" where you convince yourself that you understand (and can remember) something because you're reading it in a book or looking at a problem solution provided by someone else. Don't fall for it.

An easy-to-read book that gives some great tips on learning is: "Learn Like a Pro" by Barbara Oakley. I've recommended it (and similar books) to students with great results.
 
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  • #11
Doc Al said:
One key to effective studying is to use "retrieval practice" as much as possible. That means pulling things out of your brain, not merely rereading the text or watching others solve problems. This matches the advice from @Vanadium 50, as mentioned here:

The more you solve problems on your own, the more you'll really learn.

A lot of work has been done over the last few decades on effective study techniques. Many students use methods of study that seem natural and to make sense, but they are ineffective. For example, it's tempting to simply reread a textbook to review a topic, but that's not the best way to study. There's something called the "fluency illusion" where you convince yourself that you understand (and can remember) something because you're reading it in a book or looking at a problem solution provided by someone else. Don't fall for it.

An easy-to-read book that gives some great tips on learning is: "Learn Like a Pro" by Barbara Oakley. I've recommended it (and similar books) to students with great results.
If you understand the solution or what is written in the book, then you can reproduce it for other problems.
But if you don't understand the solution that was provided by someone else then it won't help reading it.
You might as well be regarded as a dead parrot...
 
  • #12
MathematicalPhysicist said:
If you understand the solution or what is written in the book, then you can reproduce it for other problems.
But if you don't understand the solution that was provided by someone else then it won't help reading it.
You might as well be regarded as a dead parrot...
Indeed.

But often you can fool yourself into thinking you understand a problem -- until you're faced with a slightly different problem and a blank sheet of paper.
 
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  • #13
Doc Al said:
There's something called the "fluency illusion" where you convince yourself that you understand (and can remember) something because you're reading it in a book or looking at a problem solution provided by someone else. Don't fall for it.
Amen to this. There is a great distance between watching someone work a problem and going through the motions on your own, making your own mistakes and drawing the right conclusions from them.
 
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1. Why am I having trouble retaining information after studying for a few hours?

There could be a few reasons for this. One possibility is that you are experiencing mental fatigue and your brain is unable to process new information effectively. Another possibility is that you are not using effective study techniques, such as breaking up your study sessions into smaller chunks or using active learning strategies.

2. How can I improve my memory and retention after studying?

There are several strategies you can try to improve your memory and retention after studying. These include using spaced repetition, creating visual aids or diagrams to help you remember information, and practicing retrieval by testing yourself on the material.

3. Is it normal to struggle with retaining information after studying?

Yes, it is normal to struggle with retaining information after studying. Our brains have a limited capacity for processing and storing information, so it is important to use effective study techniques to maximize our retention.

4. What can I do if I feel like I've hit a mental block while studying?

If you feel like you've hit a mental block while studying, it's important to take a break and give your brain a rest. You can also try switching up your study environment or taking a different approach to studying, such as using flashcards or teaching the material to someone else.

5. How long should I study before taking a break to avoid mental fatigue?

The length of time you can study before taking a break will vary for each individual. It's important to listen to your body and take breaks when you feel mentally fatigued. Generally, it's recommended to take a break every 45-50 minutes of studying, but this may differ depending on your personal needs.

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