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B Neutrino/anti-neutrino interactions on video

  1. Dec 22, 2017 #1
    Has anybody seen any neutrino interactions on video on the Internet where you can see the interactions that have taken place in a neutrino detectors?

    I know that the interactions in most neutrino detectors is spaced out over time (that come from the same location), but it seems to me that over a month to several months the computer generated interactions being tracked should look quite spectacular and leave "definite" tracks and trails going in all directions with more than 500 nuclear power plants on Earth.

    It seems like to me that there should be a tremendous beam piercing through the neutrino detector showing where the Sun is. As a matter of fact, it should look like the Sun has sliced open the neutrino detector in halves since the Earth rotates, whereas nuclear power plants detected would look like spears of light shafts.

    Anybody seen such a video?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 22, 2017 #2

    Orodruin

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    No, you cannot make such a video.

    In addition, the Sun does not send a "beam" of neutrinos through the detector. It radiates neutrinos isotropically in all directions. The same holds true for nuclear reactors.

    The closest you can get is the "neutrino photo" of the Sun taken by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration:
    sun.jpg
     
  4. Dec 22, 2017 #3

    ZapperZ

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    What exactly do you mean by ".... seen any neutrino interactions..."? Is this like asking has anyone seen an electron?

    We detect neutrinos via its interaction with matter, which usually produces an ejection of a relativistic electron. This electron THEN produces a Cerenkov radiation if it is traveling in a medium such as water. It is this radiation that we detect.

    So, knowing this, do you want to reformulate your question?

    Zz.
     
  5. Dec 22, 2017 #4
    Thanks Orodrium, I really like the photo that was taken. No wonder why I haven't seen any computer generated videos of the interactions of neutrinos on the Internet.

    and, Thanks ZapperZ

    Now..... can anyone tell me why... if you look at the photo, you will definitely see that the blue pixels aren't completely equally round going around the center mass, meaning that there are more of them across the photo than there is going up and down in the photo. You can see this happening in the red pixels also, but you might have to use a scale (ruler) to make sure your eyes aren't playing tricks on you. I'd think that the different colors should be equally concentric around the center mass. I've noticed this many times before. The question is why is there a flattening?
     
  6. Dec 22, 2017 #5

    Orodruin

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    You are clearly overinterpreting what you see. Most of the spread here is actually due to the angular resolution of the detector.
     
  7. Dec 22, 2017 #6

    mfb

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    ...and this angular resolution depends on the direction as well. In some directions the resolution can be better than in others as the detector is not spherical.
     
  8. Dec 22, 2017 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    And the sun is moving, so it is seen by different parts of the detector with different resolutions over time.
     
  9. Dec 25, 2017 #8

    Orodruin

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    I always considered it to be the detector that is rotating. To each their preferred frame I guess. :smile:
     
  10. Dec 25, 2017 #9

    Vanadium 50

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    If it's good enough for Aristotle, it's good enough for me!
     
  11. Dec 25, 2017 #10

    vanhees71

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    Well, to say it carefully, Aristotelian physics is somewhat outdated, given what happened for the last ~400 years of modern natural sciences.
     
  12. Dec 25, 2017 #11

    Vanadium 50

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    <foghorn leghorn>It's a joke son, I say it's a joke. </foghorn leghorn>
     
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