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No prediction ever been wrong ?

  1. Jul 11, 2010 #1
    I read that no quantum theory prediction ever been wrong!

    But I also read that at high speed (near light speed) the theory give wrong calculation result?

    This seem contradictory to me ?

    Is this theory only valid at slow speed ?

    If someone traveling near speed of light in is ship doing experiment I suppose he will get no wrong prediction ? (right?)

    So when is the prediction become wrong at near speed light? Only with outside observer?

    Could someone explain ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 11, 2010 #2
    Standard Model, which is a theory based on QM, makes some weird predictions about some processes at very high energies.

    "Near speed of light" is not enogh - SM is queite accurate there
    You need to really reach VERY high energies, 99.9999(dont know how many 9)% of light.

    Again, dont blame QM - blame SM.
     
  4. Jul 11, 2010 #3
    Only classical mechanics is limited to classic speeds. But there is relativistic quantum mechanics which works for high speeds.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_mechanics#Relativity_and_quantum_mechanics
    So this is not an issue.

    However, it's not clear how to combine the theory of gravitation with the concepts of quantum mechanics. But that's quite a tough topic so I don't know details.

    EDIT: Oh yeah. I heard at extremely high energies only found in cosmology there are new effects.
     
  5. Jul 11, 2010 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Where exactly did you read this?

    Special Relativity has been incorporated into QM. It is why we have a relativistic quantum mechanics.

    You either read something wrong, or you misunderstood something you read, or you read some crackpottery. Without giving us an exact source, none of us can tell.

    Zz.
     
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