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Now that I've decided to stick with physics, what do I do?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I just turned eighteen today, and I am realizing that it's almost time to fly the nest. Senior year isn't going to last forever, right? And so, I would like some advice from you people - you who have either made it to college, graduated college, or are planning to go to college. What do I do? I've almost gotten into Louisville, but their physics program doesn't seem all too great. Could I transfer upon making myself better known in the physics community? And what of research? Where should I start? What should I do? Or am I just freaking out about something that I don't need to worry about at this time? I'm a little scared, very anxious, and very happy at the thought of being a physicist. While I would rather challenge the clearly daring theoretical work, I would also not mind something a bit more stable and financially sound - like engineering. Although, up to this point in my life, mechanical things have done nothing but scare me. What should I do?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Talk to your university first of all. If you can't decide between physics and engineering, see what they suggest. I don't mean necessarily from a "which is better" kind of perspective, but at my school, for example, it's WAY easier to switch from engineering into physics than vice versa. The engineering program is very strict about what courses you have to take, so while the science department will count 9 out of the 10 required first year engineering courses towards a physics, math, chem, or general science degree, the engineering department will make you retake a lot of courses if you started in a science degree.

I'm not saying it's the same at your university, but I would check with them to see from an administration standpoint which one's better to start in if you're unsure. They'll also be able to give you some more information about the program if you're unsure. I mean, in university there's far more than the extreme ends of "pure" and "applied". There's lots of places in between theoretical physics and engineering.
 
  • #3
ZapperZ
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I just turned eighteen today, and I am realizing that it's almost time to fly the nest. Senior year isn't going to last forever, right? And so, I would like some advice from you people - you who have either made it to college, graduated college, or are planning to go to college. What do I do? I've almost gotten into Louisville, but their physics program doesn't seem all too great. Could I transfer upon making myself better known in the physics community? And what of research? Where should I start? What should I do? Or am I just freaking out about something that I don't need to worry about at this time? I'm a little scared, very anxious, and very happy at the thought of being a physicist. While I would rather challenge the clearly daring theoretical work, I would also not mind something a bit more stable and financially sound - like engineering. Although, up to this point in my life, mechanical things have done nothing but scare me. What should I do?
As tacky as this is, you should start reading my "So You Want To Be A Physicst" https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=240792".

Zz.
 
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