Outer space where there was no gravity

In summary: If you are moving at half the speed of light and someone else is stationary, their clock would appear to be moving slower than yours.
  • #1
cragar
2,552
3
This might be a dumb question but if we could some how get into outer space where there was no gravity except I guess for are gravitational field. would time tick infinitely fast at this point.
 
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  • #2


Time would tick normally at one second per second just like here on earth, it would only change if you reached near the speed of light, but in that case time would tick slower.
 
  • #3


It might be worth noting that you still wouldn't notice any difference when traveling at high speeds, it's only when you go back to Earth frame and notice that the people have grown old faster than you.

Something Richard Feynman stresses in his books is the principle of not knowing your absolute speed. Relativity has to work so that there is no way you can tell whether you're moving or not, since there is no such thing as absolute speed. Otherwise we would be able to tell exactly how the Earth is moving in space and thereby determine a kind of universal origin, which seems very strange the more you think about it. The principle helps in ruling out unreal scenarios from thought experiments.
 
  • #4


so is there a limit on how fast time can tick
 
  • #5


The original question doesn't make much sense. Time passes at a rate of 1 second per second for you, period. But there is no limit on how fast you percieve time to be progressing for someone else. If you are high above the center of a gravitational field and someone else is deep in it, they can perceive your time to be passing infinitely fast, depending on how deep in it they are/how strong it is.
 
  • #6


time ticking at 1second could appear fast to us in Earth frame,but this could be a very
slow rate in another frame ,right?
 
  • #7


monty37 said:
time ticking at 1second could appear fast to us in Earth frame...
I don't know what you mean. Since time only ever passes at one rate for us, words like fast and slow to describe our time alone have no meaning. Can a car move faster than itself?
...but this could be a very slow rate in another frame ,right?
Someone in another frame could measure our time to be passing at a much slower rate (or a much faster rate) than theirs, yes.
 
  • #8


iam sorry, that's what i meant ,someone in another frame could measure our
time to be passing at a much slower or faster rate than theirs.
 
  • #9


russ_watters said:
Time passes at a rate of 1 second per second for you, period.
How can we define time with time the seconds would cancel.
 
  • #10


cragar said:
How can we define time with time the seconds would cancel.
What I just gave you is not the definition of time, just an explanation of the rate.
 
  • #11


Well first of all, there is always gravity from everything, nothing in the universe isn't effecting you right now (however small the pull might be.)

But to answer your question, time doesn't go slower when you are moving faster, time always goes the exact same speed. It's only when you compare times that you find a difference. You could be traveling half the speed of light and your time would tick the exact same time as someone else who has another clock of identical structure (from each others perspective.) But if you were to look at their stationary clock while you were traveling half the speed of light, it would appear to be moving slower. It also works vica versa.
 

1. What is the concept of "no gravity" in outer space?

The concept of "no gravity" in outer space refers to the absence of a significant gravitational force that is usually present on Earth. In outer space, objects float freely because there is no external force acting on them to pull them towards a specific direction.

2. How does the absence of gravity affect astronauts in space?

The absence of gravity in space can have several effects on astronauts, including changes in their body fluids, weakening of their bones and muscles, and difficulty with movement and orientation. Astronauts may also experience changes in their vision and have a hard time adjusting back to gravity upon returning to Earth.

3. Is there really "zero gravity" in outer space?

While the term "zero gravity" is commonly used to describe the lack of gravity in space, there is actually some level of gravity present even in outer space. However, the force of gravity in space is significantly weaker compared to Earth and is often referred to as microgravity.

4. Can you create artificial gravity in outer space?

Yes, it is possible to create artificial gravity in outer space by using centrifugal force. This involves rotating a spacecraft or space station at a constant speed, which creates a force that can simulate the effects of gravity. However, this technology is still in its early stages and is not yet widely used.

5. How does the absence of gravity affect objects in space?

In the absence of gravity, objects in space will continue to move in a straight line with a constant speed unless acted upon by external forces. This means that objects will appear to float freely and not experience the pull of gravity towards other objects or planets, as they do on Earth.

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