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Ow high above the horizon the sun would be on the vernal equinox

  1. Sep 20, 2010 #1
    Lets say for a place that is at a latitude of 55 degrees, how high above the horizon the sun would be on the vernal equinox, summer solstice and winter solstice. Any hints on how to figure this out would be helpful

    I Know

    Vernal Equinox-When the sun crosses the Celestial Equator moving from south declination to north declination. All places on Earth have approximately an equal number of daylight and dark hours on this date.

    Summer Solstice: When the sun reaches its northern-most declination, and is directly over the Tropic of Cancer. It is the day with the longest period of daylight each year in the northern hemisphere.

    Winter Solstice: When the sun reaches its southern-most declination, and is directly over the Tropic of Capricorn. It is the day with the shortest period of daylight each year in the northern hemisphere.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 20, 2010 #2
    Re: Seasons

    Would the answer to Vernal equinox be 55 degrees
    would the answer to summer solstice be 78 degrees
    Would the answer to winter solstice be 32 degrees
     
  4. Sep 23, 2010 #3
    Re: Seasons

    At the spring and autumn equinox the sun is directly overhead at the equator (so 90deg to the horizon)
    As you move one degree north the sun reaches a height one degree lower (so 89deg)
    and eventually at the pole it would be 90deg lower = on the horizon. (assuming a spherical earth and neglecting refraction)

    In mid summer the sun is directly over the tropic of cancer (23.5 deg north) and in winter over the tropic of capricorn (23.5 deg south of the equator)
    And the same logic applies

    Drawing a diagram might help

    In spring the
     
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