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Oxygen/cargon monoxide when burning

  1. Aug 18, 2009 #1
    is there anything that gives off oxygen when burning rather than carbon monoxside? What I am wondering is if there is something that when burned releases oxygen that would combine with carbon monoxide and either neutralize the carbon monoxside or over ride it in some wayy
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 18, 2009 #2
    Combustion is by definition, a rapid, exothermic oxidation reaction, so no.
     
  4. Aug 18, 2009 #3

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    That's not exactly true. Though that's the definition of "combustion", it does not implly starting with pure oxygen and ending with something other than oxygen. If the oxidizer is a chemical and the reaction has an overabundance of oxygen, it can, indeed release oxygen in the reaction. This is how oxygen generators in firefighting equipment work: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_oxygen_generator

    The shuttle boosters use ammonium percholrate as an oxidizer, which is NH4ClO4 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium_perchlorate
     
  5. Aug 19, 2009 #4

    Lok

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    Sodium can "burn" in chlorine with a flame.

    You can generate oxygen by replacing it with a more reacting compound like fluorine out of it's oxides or compound. The reaction generates heat but I doubt it that you could call that combustion.

    Some chemicals are unstable and could release O2 like russ said.
     
  6. Aug 20, 2009 #5
    what I am thinking of and should have made clear is that I am wondering if there is a plant of some sort that when burned would give off oxygen that would combine with the carbon monoxide with the result that the carbon monoxide would be neutralized.
     
  7. Aug 20, 2009 #6

    Lok

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    That no. But CO burns quite well in normal air.
     
  8. Aug 20, 2009 #7

    russ_watters

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    ......and if things are burned properly, CO isn't a product of combustion anyway. I'm still confused...
     
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