Physics of far from equilibrium systems and self organization

However, it might be helpful to look for articles specifically aimed at beginners or non-experts in the field.
  • #1
ALYAZAN
12
0
peaec upon u ..

i've read an article about this topic "physics of far from equilibrium systems and self organization" written by Gregoire Nicolis

but it was truly a tough article it was talking about chaotic system but the vocabulary used was very hard for me to understand and translate to arabic ..

it's syllables were
1- thermal convection, a prototype of self-organisation phenomena in physics
and was talking about benards cells in general
2- self-organisatio phenomena in chemistry
it illustrated the (Belousov-Zhabotinski) reaction in two cases:
a- well-stirred system (chemical clock and chaos)
b- BZ reaction in a nonuniform system (spatial patterns)
3- biological systems
4- forcec versus correlations

that's what I've read uptell now but i wasn't able to understand more than 20 to 50 % of the ideas deicussed ...

and is there an easy-language article talking about the same topic (physics of far from equilibrium systems and self organization) ?

i'll be very thankfull >> and by the way is it right place to ask or to talk about such an issue??

regards
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Two possibilities:

Ilya Prigogine's 1969 book on nonequilibrium thermodynamics is a classic.

Wikipedia has a decent amount of material on the topics you mention, and it's written reasonably well.
 
  • #3


Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this topic. The physics of far from equilibrium systems and self-organization is a complex and fascinating subject that is still being studied and understood by scientists. It is completely understandable that the article you read was difficult to understand, as it is a specialized topic with technical language.

To briefly summarize, far from equilibrium systems refer to systems that are constantly changing and evolving, rather than being in a stable state. These systems can exhibit self-organization, which is the emergence of a complex and ordered structure from simple interactions between its components. This phenomenon can be observed in various fields such as physics, chemistry, and biology.

The article mentioned thermal convection, which is the movement of fluids due to differences in temperature. This is a common example of self-organization in physics, as it can lead to the formation of patterns such as Benard cells. In chemistry, the Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction is often used to study self-organization, as it can exhibit both chaotic behavior and spatial patterns depending on the conditions.

Self-organization is also observed in biological systems, such as the formation of complex structures in living organisms through interactions between individual cells. The article also mentioned the concept of forces versus correlations, which refers to the balance between external forces and internal interactions that can lead to self-organization.

As for an easier article on this topic, it may be helpful to start with more general introductions to self-organization and then gradually delve into more technical articles. It is also a good idea to consult with a physics or science teacher for further explanations and resources.

And yes, this is a suitable platform to discuss scientific topics and ask questions. It is great that you are curious and seeking to understand this complex subject. Keep learning and exploring!
 

Related to Physics of far from equilibrium systems and self organization

1. What is the definition of "far from equilibrium systems" in physics?

Far from equilibrium systems refer to physical systems that are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, meaning they are not in a stable or balanced state. These systems are constantly exchanging energy and matter with their surroundings and are typically characterized by fluctuations and nonlinear behaviors.

2. How do far from equilibrium systems differ from thermodynamic equilibrium systems?

The main difference between far from equilibrium systems and thermodynamic equilibrium systems is that the latter are in a state of balance, where the internal energy is evenly distributed and there are no net energy or matter exchanges with the surroundings. Far from equilibrium systems, on the other hand, are constantly changing and are not in a stable state.

3. Can you provide an example of a far from equilibrium system in nature?

One example of a far from equilibrium system is the Earth's climate. The Earth receives energy from the sun and releases it back into space, but this exchange is not in equilibrium. Instead, the Earth's climate is constantly changing due to various factors such as greenhouse gas emissions, ocean currents, and solar activity.

4. What is self-organization in the context of physics of far from equilibrium systems?

Self-organization refers to the ability of far from equilibrium systems to spontaneously form complex structures and patterns without external control or input. This phenomenon is a result of nonlinear interactions between the components of these systems, leading to emergent behavior and organization.

5. How do scientists study and model far from equilibrium systems and self-organization?

Scientists use various mathematical and computational models to study far from equilibrium systems and their self-organizing behaviors. These models can range from simple equations to complex simulations, and they help us understand the dynamics and patterns of these systems. Additionally, experiments on physical systems can also provide insights into the physics of far from equilibrium systems and self-organization.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
22
Views
4K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • New Member Introductions
Replies
2
Views
423
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Feedback and Announcements
Replies
1
Views
859
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
13
Views
5K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
7
Views
988
Replies
2
Views
216
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
16
Views
2K
Back
Top