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Planck's constant on a time-energy wave chart

  1. Nov 8, 2006 #1
    Does planck's constant also describe the area occupied by an entire wavelength of every possible photonic frequency in a time-energy sin/cos graph?

    Would that also mean that each photon with high frequencies have higher amplitudes while lower frequency photons have smaller amplitudes on the chart describing the wave?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 10, 2006 #2
    is this question too hard or too easy for anyone to answer?
     
  4. Nov 10, 2006 #3

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    I suspect that the reason that nobody has answered is that nobody can make sense of your question.

    Are you asking about energy versus time for a single photon? A photon has a certain amount of energy that does not vary with time, let alone as a sin/cos graph.
     
  5. Nov 11, 2006 #4
    a photon also has frequency does it not? if it has frequency does it not osccilate? if it oscilates then that is like a sin graph right?
     
  6. Nov 13, 2006 #5

    a photon also has frequency does it not? if it has frequency does it not osccilate? if it oscilates then that is like a sin graph right?
     
  7. Nov 14, 2006 #6

    jtbell

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    The frequency is associated with a quantum-mechanical wave function. The square of the wave function gives the probability of finding the particle at different locations. In general, the fact that the wave function oscillates does not mean that the particle itself oscillates in the sense of moving back and forth like a classical mass on a spring, or a water molecule in a water wave.
     
  8. Nov 14, 2006 #7
    does this mean that high frequency photons have chunkier position probability distribution wave spread while low frequency ones have their position probability distribution more gradual?

    does multiplying the frequency with planck constant to produce a higher/lower amplitude wave length mean or represent anything tangible ?
     
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