Planck's constant on a time-energy wave chart

In summary, the Planck's constant also describes the area occupied by an entire wavelength of every possible photonic frequency in a time-energy sin/cos graph. However, this does not mean that each photon with high frequencies have higher amplitudes while lower frequency photons have smaller amplitudes on the chart describing the wave.
  • #1
davidong3000
43
0
Does Planck's constant also describe the area occupied by an entire wavelength of every possible photonic frequency in a time-energy sin/cos graph?

Would that also mean that each photon with high frequencies have higher amplitudes while lower frequency photons have smaller amplitudes on the chart describing the wave?
 
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  • #2
is this question too hard or too easy for anyone to answer?
 
  • #3
I suspect that the reason that nobody has answered is that nobody can make sense of your question.

Are you asking about energy versus time for a single photon? A photon has a certain amount of energy that does not vary with time, let alone as a sin/cos graph.
 
  • #4
a photon also has frequency does it not? if it has frequency does it not osccilate? if it oscilates then that is like a sin graph right?
 
  • #5
jtbell said:
I suspect that the reason that nobody has answered is that nobody can make sense of your question.

Are you asking about energy versus time for a single photon? A photon has a certain amount of energy that does not vary with time, let alone as a sin/cos graph.


a photon also has frequency does it not? if it has frequency does it not osccilate? if it oscilates then that is like a sin graph right?
 
  • #6
The frequency is associated with a quantum-mechanical wave function. The square of the wave function gives the probability of finding the particle at different locations. In general, the fact that the wave function oscillates does not mean that the particle itself oscillates in the sense of moving back and forth like a classical mass on a spring, or a water molecule in a water wave.
 
  • #7
jtbell said:
The frequency is associated with a quantum-mechanical wave function. The square of the wave function gives the probability of finding the particle at different locations. In general, the fact that the wave function oscillates does not mean that the particle itself oscillates in the sense of moving back and forth like a classical mass on a spring, or a water molecule in a water wave.
does this mean that high frequency photons have chunkier position probability distribution wave spread while low frequency ones have their position probability distribution more gradual?

does multiplying the frequency with Planck constant to produce a higher/lower amplitude wave length mean or represent anything tangible ?
 

Related to Planck's constant on a time-energy wave chart

1. What is Planck's constant?

Planck's constant, represented by the symbol h, is a fundamental constant in quantum mechanics that relates the energy of a photon to its frequency. It is a crucial component in understanding the behavior of particles on a microscopic level.

2. How is Planck's constant related to time and energy on a wave chart?

On a time-energy wave chart, Planck's constant is used to calculate the energy of a photon based on its frequency and the amount of time it exists. This allows us to visualize the relationship between time, energy, and frequency in the quantum world.

3. What are the units of Planck's constant?

Planck's constant has units of energy multiplied by time, or joule-seconds (J·s) in the International System of Units (SI). In other systems of units, it may be expressed as electron volt-seconds (eV·s) or erg-seconds (erg·s).

4. How was Planck's constant discovered?

Planck's constant was first introduced by the German physicist Max Planck in 1900 as a mathematical constant in his theory of blackbody radiation. It was later confirmed experimentally by Robert Millikan in 1912 through his famous oil drop experiment.

5. What is the significance of Planck's constant?

Planck's constant is significant because it provides a link between classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. It also plays a crucial role in many important physical concepts, such as the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the Schrödinger equation. It is also used in various practical applications, such as the development of new technologies like lasers and transistors.

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